Cannibals All! or, Slaves Without Masters

George Fitzhugh

You are here: Home - Uncategorized - Cannibals All! or, Slaves Without Masters


Cannibals All! or, Slaves Without Masters

Cannibals All or Slaves Without Masters Cannibals All got attention in William Lloyd Garrison s Liberator than any other book in the history of that abolitionist journal And Lincoln is said to have been angered by George Fitzhugh than by an

  • Title: Cannibals All! or, Slaves Without Masters
  • Author: George Fitzhugh
  • ISBN: 9780674094512
  • Page: 131
  • Format: Paperback
  • Cannibals All got attention in William Lloyd Garrison s Liberator than any other book in the history of that abolitionist journal And Lincoln is said to have been angered by George Fitzhugh than by any other pro slavery writer, yet he unconsciously paraphrased Cannibals All in his House Divided speech.Fitzhugh was provocative because of his stinging atta Cannibals All got attention in William Lloyd Garrison s Liberator than any other book in the history of that abolitionist journal And Lincoln is said to have been angered by George Fitzhugh than by any other pro slavery writer, yet he unconsciously paraphrased Cannibals All in his House Divided speech.Fitzhugh was provocative because of his stinging attack on free society, laissez faire economy, and wage slavery, along with their philosophical underpinnings He used socialist doctrine to defend slavery and drew upon the same evidence Marx used in his indictment of capitalism Socialism, he held, was only the new fashionable name for slavery, though slavery was far humane and responsible, the best and most common form of socialism His most effective testimony was furnished by the abolitionists themselves He combed the diatribes of their friends, the reformers, transcendentalists, and utopians, against the social evils of the North Why all this, he asked, except that free society is a failure The trouble all started, according to Fitzhugh, with John Locke, a presumptuous charlatan, and with the heresies of the Enlightenment In the great Lockean consensus that makes up American thought from Benjamin Franklin to Franklin Roosevelt, Fitzhugh therefore stands out as a lone dissenter who makes the conventional polarities between Jefferson and Hamilton, or Hoover and Roosevelt, seem insignificant Beside him Taylor, Randolph, and Calhoun blend inconspicuously into the American consensus, all being apostles of John Locke in some degree An intellectual tradition that suffers from uniformity even if it is virtuous, liberal conformity could stand a bit of contrast, and George Fitzhugh can supply of it than any other American thinker.

    • [PDF] Ö Unlimited ¿ Cannibals All! or, Slaves Without Masters : by George Fitzhugh ✓
      131 George Fitzhugh
    • thumbnail Title: [PDF] Ö Unlimited ¿ Cannibals All! or, Slaves Without Masters : by George Fitzhugh ✓
      Posted by:George Fitzhugh
      Published :2018-05-13T12:25:06+00:00

    One thought on “Cannibals All! or, Slaves Without Masters

    1. Rob on said:

      Ah, this was an anomaly.I picked up this book at a campus booksale because it was just so odd. A book with the word cannibal in the title, which was also a defense of slavery where the author was not only boostering the slavery of Africans but the slavery of pretty much everybody? I had to read it. So I read it.Fitzhugh is an interesting case, as he pretty much attacks every angle of what is now considered American virtue. Free enterprise? Democracy? Capitalism? In the eyes of Fitzhugh all of th [...]

    2. Ted on said:

      It is commonly said that Southerners initially defended slavery as a necessary weakness, but that as the peculiar institution came under increasing attack, they began characterizing it as a "positive good." Fitzhugh certainly takes the latter tack in this thought-provoking defense - nay, celebration - of the slave labor system. The author contends that the enlightened among us actually have a responsibility to enslave the weak in order to protect them. Analogizing to the family, he acknowledges [...]

    3. Amber on said:

      Perfect example of racist mentality. Read it to to comprehend, not convert.

    4. Robert on said:

      Typically a book like this that serves my understanding of historical arguments gets a standard 3 stars (unless I find it particularly worthwhile). In this case, the moral bankruptcy and hypocrisy of its author compel me to take away a star. However, its value in clarifying philosophical arguments for slavery is real.There is a trope on the American Right that *"The" Democrats supported slavery and Jim Crow*, and this is often extended to "the" "progressives" as well. "The" is in quotes as, of c [...]

    5. Will on said:

      "The Abolitionists boast, that lands are dearer and labor cheaper in free than in slave society. Either proposition contains the admission that free laborers work more for others and less for themselves than slaves - in effect, that they are less free than slaves. The profits of land are what the landowner appropriates of the results of work of the laborer. Where he appropriates most, and leaves the laborer least, there lands are dearest, labor cheapest, and laborers least free. In Europe, lands [...]

    6. Alec Sieber on said:

      Fitzhugh's rhetoric is often incisive, and his assaults on the hypocrisies of abolition are always entertaining. However, this is certainly a book of its time, likely only of interest for the historically minded. I didn't mind, as I was fascinated by the exploration of the mid nineteenth century intellectual scene, in which a clever man like Fitzhugh could defend slavery, borrowing equally from Marx and Filmer. What a strange and delightful synthesis! My main problem with the book was that it wa [...]

    7. Jason on said:

      Strange to be transported back to the antebellum southern view of slavery. Fitzhugh's passion sounds like every sentence should be written in all caps. He is WAY over the top in his analogies and his passion for the slave economy. It's a meaningful read for anyone who wants to understand the slave owning mentality. Probably most interesting to modern readers is that Fitzhugh comes to his support of slavery from a left-wing / socialist view instead of the right-wing / racist view that would be ex [...]

    8. Andee Nero on said:

      Three stars for racism. I cannot decide if Fitzhugh is mad or a genius with his plot to enslave 19 out of every 20 people on earth.

    9. Sue on said:

      Awful. It's English but whatever story was intended is garbled and unreadable.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *