Too Close To Home

Georgia Blain

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Too Close To Home

Too Close To Home How tenuous the links are that build a life Too Close To Home takes us right inside who we really are Freya writes uncomfortable domestic dramas Her friends work in theatre and film show in galleries

  • Title: Too Close To Home
  • Author: Georgia Blain
  • ISBN: 9781864711776
  • Page: 164
  • Format: Paperback
  • How tenuous the links are that build a life Too Close To Home takes us right inside who we really are.Freya writes uncomfortable domestic dramas Her friends work in theatre and film, show in galleries, talk politics and are trying new ways of having children with friends These are the people who are slowly gentrifying the next ring of inner city suburbs while praising tHow tenuous the links are that build a life Too Close To Home takes us right inside who we really are.Freya writes uncomfortable domestic dramas Her friends work in theatre and film, show in galleries, talk politics and are trying new ways of having children with friends These are the people who are slowly gentrifying the next ring of inner city suburbs while praising their diversity.As the stultifying heat of summer descends, Shane, an Aboriginal man, moves up the road He was once close to Matt, Freya s partner, and he not only brings with him a different approach to life, he also has news of a boy who might be Matt s son Despite wanting toembrace all that Shane represents and the possibility of another child in their life, Freya and Matt stumble, failing each other and their beliefs.

    • Unlimited [Cookbooks Book] ☆ Too Close To Home - by Georgia Blain ¶
      164 Georgia Blain
    • thumbnail Title: Unlimited [Cookbooks Book] ☆ Too Close To Home - by Georgia Blain ¶
      Posted by:Georgia Blain
      Published :2018-02-14T22:52:02+00:00

    One thought on “Too Close To Home

    1. Michael Livingston on said:

      An interesting and thoughtful book, about a lefty middle-class family whose comfortable progressiveness is challenged by the discovery of a child they didn't know existed. Blain is a lovely, exacting writer, but the emotions at the core of this book didn't really connect with me - Matt and Freya's relationship didn't have the same spark as, say, Freya's relationship with her best friend Anna. Still, nice to read a contemporary Australian novel concerned with politics at both the macro and micro [...]

    2. Susan on said:

      I think that this book is well written: the prose is lovely, and at times it is insightful. However, by the end of it I felt that something was lacking to make it a really good book, one that would leave a mark on me. Maybe it was that the protagonist didn't really seem to struggle at all - and that her problems seemed a bit too self-indulgent for me to really care. I didn't really care for any of the characters, to be honest. Not Blain's best peice of work, but still worth the read.

    3. Kirsten on said:

      Great book for making me feel as uncomfortable as it did. The title is indeed apt, throwing into sharp relief the culture I live in, which is all talk all left labor angst guilt without any practical effect. Thrown into the mix is a dysfunctional marriage, relationships between inner city suburbanites and an aboriginal family, and the question of whether an affair from years ago led to a child. It's also against the backdrop of very recent Australian federal politics. Highly recommend it.

    4. Sally on said:

      I found this book strangely compelling, I read it quite quickly, I found I couldn't put it down, which I am a bit surprised at, as I actually loathed almost everyone in this book except for the kids. This is an uncomfortable look at white, middle class life in Australia. I say 'uncomfortable' not just because uncomfortable writing is part of the story, but it did genuinely make me uncomfortable because I could see myself. We white, middle class folk do tend to sit around in our privileged bubble [...]

    5. Sue on said:

      Interesting reading about ily and a family facing domestic dramas within their family and with friends

    6. Carol -Reading Writing and Riesling on said:

      3 1/2 starsThe first few chapters did not inspire me to read much further –I don’t know why, they just did not engage me but I forged on and soon found myself totally engrossed in this narrative. It is a gently told story of relationships, of how the individual person can be political and of modern day suburban Australia, and I am pleased I read this book. It did make me think, it made me a little sad; the revealing of personal prejudices, personal stories which for me asked one important qu [...]

    7. Rebeccahowden on said:

      I wanted to like this book, I truly did. I really loved Closed for Winter – Blain’s haunting, poignant 1998 novel that I believe is now a movie staring Natalie Imbruglia – and the cover image of this book appealed to me, but in the end I felt a bit underwhelmed by it. It’s not that the premise isn’t good. The story is narrated by a middle-aged playwright called Freya, and centres around the discovery that her husband Matt may have had another child he didn’t know about 17 years ago. [...]

    8. Jen on said:

      Contemporary novel about a group of friends from University and their partners and families. Freya is a 40 something playwright living in the suburbs of Sydney with husband Matt, an architect, and daughter Ella. Anna is an actor, married to Paolo, who doesn't want Anna to have a child. Mikhala is an artist with a successful new show. And Louise, a director, has returned to Australia to have a child with Scott and Alistair. Matt's friend, Shane, an Aboriginal lawyer, comes to live in the same sub [...]

    9. Penni Russon on said:

      This was a compelling novel, a gripping gen-x domestic family drama that plays against a larger backdrop of political ideas. It really shows the way that politics entangle and intersect our personal lives (the personal is political here), but also it suggests that politics is only one agent for social change, and that the current state of things in our cultural climate could be an opportunity for great change. Idealism and cynicism is so charmingly and perfectly balanced here that the novel reso [...]

    10. Radford Secondary Library on said:

      Freya has been the only woman amongst her friends to have a child. As a number of these women approach 40 they too are wanting children and fearing they have left it too late. An Aboriginal family, the father, Shane, being an old friend of Matt's, has moved in up the road with a different approach to parenting and life than Freya and Matt, and, as these things do, watching Shane's more laissez faire approach to life makes them start to question their own settled and chiding approach. There are s [...]

    11. Robyn Canny on said:

      A novel set in contemporary Sydney referencing actual political & current events from approx. 4 years ago! The main character, Freya, is a writer (mostly plays) and seems to never be satisfied with her life. While I enjoyed the book, I'm not sure if I would recommend as sometimes I feel I enjoy things just because they are easy reads! Also, I didn't really like any of the characters which reminded me of my thoughts of The Slap. This is a really bad "review"!

    12. Carolyn Mck on said:

      The issues that illustrate the title are both racial and domestic. Freya thinks of herself as enlightened but has difficulties dealing with her partner’s friendship with aboriginal Shane and his son and the discovery of a child born to Lisa, a previous lover of Matt. The child may or may not be his. Issues around the 2010 Australian election are also canvassed. Blain writes well but the novel’s characters and issues didn’t engage me. Not memorable.

    13. Sophie Shanahan on said:

      This was the most forgettable story I've read in a long while. It went nowhere and said nothing. And I hated the characters.

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