What We Talk About When We Talk About Love

Raymond Carver

You are here: Home - Uncategorized - What We Talk About When We Talk About Love


What We Talk About When We Talk About Love

What We Talk About When We Talk About Love Alternate cover edition can be found here In his second collection Carver establishes his reputation as one of the most celebrated short story writers in American literature a haunting meditation on

  • Title: What We Talk About When We Talk About Love
  • Author: Raymond Carver
  • ISBN: 9780679723059
  • Page: 322
  • Format: Paperback
  • Alternate cover edition can be found here In his second collection, Carver establishes his reputation as one of the most celebrated short story writers in American literature a haunting meditation on love, loss, and companionship, and finding one s way through the dark.

    • Best Download [Raymond Carver] ☆ What We Talk About When We Talk About Love || [Contemporary Book] PDF í
      322 Raymond Carver
    • thumbnail Title: Best Download [Raymond Carver] ☆ What We Talk About When We Talk About Love || [Contemporary Book] PDF í
      Posted by:Raymond Carver
      Published :2019-01-15T12:21:43+00:00

    One thought on “What We Talk About When We Talk About Love

    1. KFed on said:

      I'll announce the cliche of my loving this book before you beat me to it.I'm an overeducated, mock-contemplative early-twenty-something with a penchant for strong male voices (despite my feminist leanings) and a distaste for anything too sentimental. I was raised in the tradition of "Show, Don't Tell" and hold this closer than even my favorite teddy (whose name is Atticus.) My middle name is "Minimalism." My other middle name is "Ooh, that sounds pretty."With that out of the way, yes, of course [...]

    2. Jason Koivu on said:

      A collection of slice-of-life short stories that mostly go nowhere and end ambiguously, and for some damn reason I loved them. Carver gets mileage out of yard sales, photographers offering their services, accidental death, a night of bingo, doing things and doing nothing, talking yet saying nothing.As a reader, I was frustrated when some of the stories went nowhere. I expected and hoped for big conclusions, finality, and instead I got dudes driving away from confrontations holding ashtrays. But [...]

    3. Glenn Russell on said:

      This collection part of the 1980s Vintage Contemporaries series includes seventeen vintage Raymond Carver, including Viewfinder - An abandoned husband chucks stone as he is photographed up on his roof by a door-to-door salesman/photographer who had hooks instead of hands; A Serous Talk - An ex-husband expresses his rage when his ex-wife takes a telephone call in the bedroom by cutting the telephone line in the kitchen; One More Thing – A husband, wife and daughter accuse one another of being n [...]

    4. Ilse on said:

      HummingbirdSuppose I say summer,write the word “hummingbird,”put it in an envelope,take it down the hillto the box. When you openmy letter you will recallthose days and how much,just how much, I love you.Capturing bliss in one word, crystallising tenderness and love at once into a precious gift and a delicate act of remembrance, Hummingbird, the affectionate poem closing this collection, charmed me in its endearing simplicity and ended up as my favourite - reading this short poem magically t [...]

    5. Garima on said:

      Milan Kundera in his short story collection Laughable Loves, talks about the inevitable absurdity that revolves around the highly misunderstood feeling of Love that begins with innocent stargazing but later tempt numerous meteors to destroy the vulnerable abode of lovers. Promises are ditched, mushy definitions are torn apart and even when other things remain equal or unequal; he/she still loves me just doesn’t matter anymore. What remains is this filthy carcass of emotions that some people ta [...]

    6. Joshua Nomen-Mutatio on said:

      "Booze takes a lot of time and effort if you’re going to do a good job with it."Indeed. If one wanted to distill the stories within this collection down to a pithy, inverted, Hallmark-style aphorism, this would be a top contender.(Click For Review Soundtrack: "Little Person")Drinking and smoking and talking: these are the true main characters of Carver’s world (and make no mistake: he’s summoned and crafted a distinctive world). Okay, we can quibble and refer to this trifecta more aptly as [...]

    7. Greg on said:

      My fucking head hurts. I should be writing my thesis, but the math part of crunching the data is hurting my head. It shouldn't though. It should be easy math. I'm dumber than I used to be. Instead I'll procrastinate, and share a review I wrote 6 years ago for another website that I haven't written a single thing on in just about 6 years. All date references should have six years added to them. After reading MFSO's review I wanted to make some comment about a line that I really like in the first [...]

    8. Andrew Smith on said:

      I first became interested in this book when I read Haruki Murakami’s memoir What I Talk About When I Talk About Running. Any book that can inspire Murakami to steal (most of) the line must be worth reading. Mustn’t it? Well I thought so, though it took me some time to get around to this collection of 17 short stories. The cover of the Vintage Classics version I read is sparse and the blurb gave nothing away. Ah well, in for a penny… Originally published in 1981, the prose is lean and the g [...]

    9. Paquita Maria Sanchez on said:

      This is like what would happen if Walker Evans had built a time machine, gunned it to he 1970's, landed in the field of some pop. 1000 Oregon hunting town, plopped down at a bar stool, and started writing field notes for photos of the place and the folks contained therein. He isn't actually going to shoot the images this time, though. Fill in the lines with your own muck.Sparse, s(p)earing, simple stuff. Even if you don't generally go for a minimalist approach, Carver has this un-thumb-downable [...]

    10. Nancy on said:

      Posted at Shelf Inflicted When I started reading, I found these stories a little too spare, a little unfinished. They were snippets of lonely people and troubled relationships, but nothing I could really sink my teeth into. I set the book aside and when I picked it up a second time, I discovered that these stories are better digested when read with fewer interruptions. Although these stories are about a variety of characters, I found their commonalities, differences, views and struggles very com [...]

    11. Diane on said:

      I picked up this collection of Raymond Carver stories after watching the movie "Birdman," which features a play based on the title story. When I finished reading it, I was both impressed at Carver's brisk dialogue and wishing there had been more. He sketches scenes well, dances around a topic, reaches for an emotional peak, and then closes. Like most short stories, it's a marvel of efficiency. But I still wish there had been more heft.

    12. David Schaafsma on said:

      “What do any of us really know about love? It seems to me we're just beginners at love. We say we love each other and we do, I don't doubt it. I love Terri and Terri loves me, and you guys love each other too. You know the kind of love I'm talking about now. Physical love, that impulse that drives you to someone special, as well as love of the other person's being, his or her essence, as it were. Carnal love and, well, call it sentimental love, the day-to-day caring about the other person. But [...]

    13. Joe Valdez on said:

      If I had a teacher in high school who assigned Raymond Carver, I would've gone bananas for What We Talk About When We Talk About Love, a 1981 collection of seventeen stories published in literary journals in the '70s or early '80s. After being required to read Orwell and the goddam Canterbury Tales, reading So Much Water So Close to Home--where men on a fishing trip discover a woman's body in the river and wait until the end of their weekend to report it--would've been like ducking a bullet fire [...]

    14. K.D. Absolutely on said:

      Dirty Realism is the genre where this book is classified. Coined in the 80's, the dirty-realism school of writing became popular during that decade due to the writings of Raymond Carver, Angela Carter, Bobbie Ann Mason, Richard Ford, Tobias Wolff among others. Their language is sparse and their characters are the blue-collar, middle-class Americans who faced disappointments, heartbreaks and harsh truths in their ordinary lives.I have been reading a biography of Haruki Murakami and read last week [...]

    15. Teresa Proença on said:

      A primeira coisa que me ocorre dizer sobre este tesouro:Vocês que me lêem, se puderem leiam-no…Entreguem-se-lhe e terão uma fabulosa experiência literária!São pequeninos contos - episódios do quotidiano - que falam de amor, de todas as formas de amor – e muito da falta dele -, amor fraterno, amor amante, amor conjugal, amor perdido, amor reencontrado, amor amizade,…; e de desamor, muito desamor…São pequenos relatos de amor, de desejo, de morte, de egoísmo,de crueldade e que nos [...]

    16. Cecily on said:

      A collection of short stories first published in 1981, but feeling a couple of decades older. They are heavily edited versions of "Beginners", which I reviewed HERE). Comparing the two versions of these stories demonstrates that Stephen King's assertion that "The editor is always right" is not necessarily true. See my review of On Writing, HERE). Each is a vivid glimpse of people at a troubling time in their lives. One of the early ones contains the line "Booze takes a lot of effort if you're go [...]

    17. Trin on said:

      Stylistically incredible if relentlessly depressing short stories. I read this because Haruki Murakami counts Carver as an influence, and I can see that: they share a certain spare clarity of prose, and an occasional touch of beautiful oddness (though Murakami takes the latter much farther than Carver does). But while Murakami is often quite funny, Carver is just bleak—read too many of these stories in a row and you’ll want to throw yourself off the roof. Read in sequence like that, they als [...]

    18. Tina on said:

      I attended the wedding of my brother's best friend last week. I like weddings. It may be something that runs in the family since my brother is a wedding videographer. But I really, really like attending weddings, because it's such a happy, happy day. Plus, I really like hearing wedding vows.Anyway, my wedding weekend read was Raymond Carver's What We Talk About When We Talk About Love, which I borrowed from Angus when I got the chance to check out his bookshelf. This is my first Carver, and the [...]

    19. StevenGodin on said:

      Raymond Carver is simply one of the best post-war American writers, simply because he keeps everything within, simple, crisp and clear. He honed his writing craft to such a degree here that this collection may well be his best work. Focusing on lonely men and women who talk, drink, go fishing and play cards to pass the time of day. Told in a minimalist style with a razor-sharp sense of how people get along in a contemporary America using dialogue that reads like an absolute dream. There's still [...]

    20. Simona on said:

      Il mio approccio con Carver inizia con questa raccolta di racconti. Una raccolta che sembra un album fotografico in cui ogni storia è una istantanea della vita nella sua quotidianità e del mondo di Carver. I personaggi della raccolta sono autisti, artisti, commessi, sono reietti, sono personaggi che preferiscono vivere una vita ai margini della società piuttosto che esserne i protagonisti. Una vita in cui non solo l'alcool è il protagonista, ma anche e soprattutto l'amore come recita il tito [...]

    21. Shovelmonkey1 on said:

      In friendshipIn affectionIn loveIn lustIn perpetuity In memoriamIs this what we talk about when we talk about love? Carver's stories are short, pared down love stories, stripped of everything but the necessary words and the skeletal, frequently all too human frame upon which to hang them. Some of his work doesn't seem like a love story at all, think Hemingway, if he left out the toros, marlin fishing and drinking. Carver is a landlocked Hemingway in fact. You might be left wondering, where is th [...]

    22. Minh Nhân Nguyễn on said:

      5 sao.Biết nói gì về cuốn này, mình cho 5 sao là hiểu mình yêu quý nó đến thế nào. Các câu chuyện không chỉ hay ở nội dung mà còn gắn với nhiều kỷ niệm của mình, cuốn này mỏng thôi nhưng những trang sách đã theo mình trong một thời gian dài, đó là những buổi tối khuya yên bình, sự tĩnh lặng, những con người sẽ không gặp lại, là ký ức

    23. Algernon on said:

      What do any of us really know about love? It seems to me we're just beginners at love. We say we love each other and we do, I don't doubt it. I love Terri and Terri loves me, and you guys love each other too. You know the kind of love I'm talking about now. Physical love, that impulse that drives you to someone special, as well as love of the other person's being, his or her essence, as it were. Carnal love and, well, call it sentimental love, the day-to-day caring about the other person. But so [...]

    24. mai ahmd on said:

      تجربتي الأولى مع كارفر ، اقتنيت الكتاب عندما علمت أن موراكامي اقتبس عنوان كتابه (عن ماذا أتحدث عندما أتحدث عن الركض ) من عنوان كارفر وقيل لي أن موراكامي تأثر بهذا الكاتب وهذين سببين كافيين بالنسبة لي لأطلع على أعماله بدءا كان من الصعب فهم كارفر من أول قصتين حقيقة لم يكن الأمر [...]

    25. Rowena on said:

      Interesting collection of short stories, the first I've read from Carver. The stories are quite captivating in a simplistic way. They often end before the full story has been fully told. I guess that may add to the intrigue, but it frustrated me reading a story that wasn't quite done,in my eyes. I look forward to reading more from him.

    26. Madeleine on said:

      One of the great things about New Year's is that a night of uncommon revelry means that I have no excuse not to spend an entire day all curled up with a book and a nest of blankets. And, oh boy oh boy, did I ever stumble upon a winner of a short-story collection with this one. Among the myriad joys to be found in these decidedly bleak little snapshots -- and I place this above the unparalleled use of understatement, which is a thing that usually tickles me hardest about masterfully written prose [...]

    27. Bắp on said:

      Chẳng biết nên nói gì về cuốn này. Ai đó đã từng nói nốt nhạc không làm nên bản nhạc mà là khoảng cách giữa chúng. Mình chưa thực sự sờ mó được tường tận cái khoảng cách của Carver, mặc dù mình biết rằng mình bị ăn đấm.Không như những phần tử khủng bố thích tràn vào tâm trí, đấm tới tấp, vô cùng mãnh liệt, và khuấy động tới kinh hoàng cái vùng ấy lên, Carver chỉ đấm hờ h [...]

    28. rahul on said:

      FearFear of seeing a police car pull into the drive.Fear of falling asleep at night.Fear of not falling asleep.Fear of the past rising up.Fear of the present taking flight.Fear of the telephone that rings in the dead of night.Fear of electrical storms.Fear of the cleaning woman who has a spot on her cheek!Fear of dogs I've been told won't bite.Fear of anxiety!Fear of having to identify the body of a dead friend.Fear of running out of money.Fear of having too much, though people will not believe [...]

    29. Dagio_maya on said:

      Minimalista a chi? Stralcio di un dialogo da lettore a lettrice«Ah, ti piacciono i racconti. Bene. Hai letto Carver?»«Ancora no.»Segue silenzio imbarazzante.Passano i giorni…«Hai letto Carver?»«Ancora no.»Segue silenzio imbarazzante.Passano i mesi…«Hai letto Carver?»«Ancora no.»Segue silenzio imbarazzante.Passano gli anni…Carver Carver Carver Carver Carver Carver Carver Carver Carver Carver Carver Carver…………………«Hai letto Carver?»«Siii!»«Era ora!!! Quindi? Cos [...]

    30. Priyanka on said:

      Carver’s short stories present spare glimpses of characters entrapped in a frazzled web of relationships and events whose significance they cannot understand. He generously uses symbolism to advance the story’s theme where a lot takes place between the lines. His symbolic guideposts are so reliable and meticulously crafted that they resolve ambiguity rather than creating it.Carver’s slices of life ranges from surrealism in “Viewfinder” and “Why don’t you dance?”, to careful omiss [...]

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *