The Lost Arts of Hearth and Home: The Happy Luddite's Guide to Domestic Self-Sufficiency

Ken Albala Rosanna Nafziger Rosanna Nafziger Henderson

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The Lost Arts of Hearth and Home: The Happy Luddite's Guide to Domestic Self-Sufficiency

The Lost Arts of Hearth and Home The Happy Luddite s Guide to Domestic Self Sufficiency The Lost Arts of Hearth and Home is not about extreme off the grid living It s for city and suburban dwellers with day jobs people who love to cook love fresh natural ingredients and old techniques

  • Title: The Lost Arts of Hearth and Home: The Happy Luddite's Guide to Domestic Self-Sufficiency
  • Author: Ken Albala Rosanna Nafziger Rosanna Nafziger Henderson
  • ISBN: 9780399537776
  • Page: 437
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The Lost Arts of Hearth and Home is not about extreme, off the grid living It s for city and suburban dwellers with day jobs people who love to cook, love fresh natural ingredients, and old techniques for preservation people who like doing things themselves with a needle and thread, garden hoe, or manual saw Ken Albala and Rosanna Nafziger Henderson spread the spirit oThe Lost Arts of Hearth and Home is not about extreme, off the grid living It s for city and suburban dwellers with day jobs people who love to cook, love fresh natural ingredients, and old techniques for preservation people who like doing things themselves with a needle and thread, garden hoe, or manual saw Ken Albala and Rosanna Nafziger Henderson spread the spirit of antiquated self sufficiency throughout the household They offer projects that are decidedly unplugged and a little daring, including Home building projects like rooftop food dehydrators and wood burning ovens Homemaking essentials, from sewing and quilting to rug braiding and soap making The wonders of grain making croissants by hand, sprouting grains, and baking bread Adventures with meat pickled pig s feet, homemade liverwurst, and celery cured salami Intended for industrious cooks and crafters who aren t afraid to roll up their sleeves, The Lost Arts of Hearth and Home will teach you the history and how to on projects for every facet of your home, all without the electric toys that take away from the experience of making things by hand.

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      437 Ken Albala Rosanna Nafziger Rosanna Nafziger Henderson
    • thumbnail Title: [PDF] ò Free Download ¶ The Lost Arts of Hearth and Home: The Happy Luddite's Guide to Domestic Self-Sufficiency : by Ken Albala Rosanna Nafziger Rosanna Nafziger Henderson ↠
      Posted by:Ken Albala Rosanna Nafziger Rosanna Nafziger Henderson
      Published :2019-02-08T04:56:36+00:00

    One thought on “The Lost Arts of Hearth and Home: The Happy Luddite's Guide to Domestic Self-Sufficiency

    1. Kathleen on said:

      I love the whole DIY, self-sufficiency, anti-consumerist movement. And I understand why people in that subculture choose to do things like grow their own food when its "easier" to buy it. Part of that culture is reclaiming lost skills, becoming more self-sufficient, in order to extricate oneself as much as possible from a destructive and exploitative capitalist system. I'm all for it.This book is not in that spirit. It seems like the only animating reason here to grind your own flour or make you [...]

    2. Laura on said:

      There are some pretty far out DIY projects in this. For example, I am NEVER going to take the time to collect and process acorns in order to make acorn flour crepes. They sound amazing but wow, WAY too much work for me. Ditto for most of the stuff in this book. However, I did read through all of it because it's really quite interesting to read how to make all this stuff if you really want too. And now I totally want to collect old wool blankets and make us a braided wool rug for our dining room [...]

    3. Erin on said:

      Fun, quirky, but serious book that tells me not only how to make my own kombucha but also how to clean with it and the history behind it. Everything in this book is done taken the long way--from making quilts to building an outdoor cooking stove. The writers speak authoritatively and are intense about the slow ways of making a house a home, in all the domestic arts. A fascinating read not because I'm going to implement much of what I read, but because I learned so much reading it.

    4. Susan Grace on said:

      What a wonderful book! I received this as a gift from a very dear friend who knows how I like to experiment in cooking. I am a crafter and I love to create! This book offers heartfelt, joyful guidance on everything from sewing to brewing spirits to making a ring out of a silver quarter! I am definitely going to make a ring! I thoroughly enjoyed the "go for it" attitude on all the arts Ken and Rosanna write of. They share their own experiences, experiments and successes. What a delightful book!

    5. Stefan on said:

      pretty cool, but more esoteric than practical overall. Good read though

    6. Cheryl on said:

      Some interesting things - I think I am not gonna GRIND my own wheat for flour however. :)

    7. Cory on said:

      This is an entirely impractical, mad, and merry adventure through a grab-bag of archaic and odd domestic arts. The breezy, "try it and you might like it!" attitude might confuse or annoy some readers, but I found it a refreshing change from typical DIY books that expect very little imagination. This contains more inspiration than instruction, and should be approached accordingly. Some sections are detailed projects (rug braiding, kombucha), others are little more than off-the-cuff suggestions, a [...]

    8. Mark on said:

      This is a very US-centric book, but once past the occasional recommendations for places to buy stuff in the US, and the US measurements, things like descriptions of US legal issues around proper Normandy camembert (made with unpasteurised milk), poppy seeds (common on bagels, but apparently 'not allowed') add a little interest for the non-US reader.Some of the stuff just isn't likely to be done by those in small UK households - building a wood-fired oven, anyone? and there are a lot of places wh [...]

    9. Allison on said:

      Having finished reading this charming little book, I find myself immediately wanting to read their first one, The Lost Art of Real Cooking.This book is chock full of interesting recipes and directions for recreating lost but still useful, handy and fun to know how to make things. I really like the way it is organized and each individual component covered could be tried at home separately as an afternoon or weekend project. And, while it isn't specifically written with children in mind, many of t [...]

    10. Denise on said:

      Title is a bit misleading, this is more of a "cabinet of curiosities" style book than an actual guide to do anything, there's more reminiscing and musing on things than actually getting down to much how-to business. But still, it's an interesting "cabinet" they've collected. I really must try those caramelized eggs.

    11. Rachael on said:

      This was more fun than I expected. Not a 'back to lander' book but a nice practical guide for home & hearth skills. Witty writing and doesn't try to stay within the 'history' or 'niche' of the happy hippy homesteader but instead makes these skills simple and contemporary in our regularly busy lives. I would happily own this book for reference on how-to's and recipes.

    12. Emily Mellow on said:

      I love Ken Albala's writing and now want to read his other books. While I do feel like I learned a lot from this book and got inspired to try new stuff, it would really be improved with useful photographs illustrating each section. Nevertheless, it was a pleasure to read.

    13. Ietrio on said:

      This is a book for people who have too much time on their hands. And the title is misleading, nothing about luddites.

    14. Jennybeast on said:

      I really like this book and its emphasis on doing work by hand. Great selection of skills and recipes, easy to follow directions and notes. Someday, someday, I will work through more of the contents.

    15. Sue on said:

      Difficult to read due to the author's narcissistic attitude. It should be entertaining and informative based on data but the personality overwhelmed this lovely little tract of good informnation

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