The Dawn of Innovation: The First American Industrial Revolution

Charles R. Morris David Colacci

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The Dawn of Innovation: The First American Industrial Revolution

The Dawn of Innovation The First American Industrial Revolution In the thirty years after the Civil War the United States blew by Great Britain to become the greatest economic power in world history That is a well known period in history when titans like Andrew

  • Title: The Dawn of Innovation: The First American Industrial Revolution
  • Author: Charles R. Morris David Colacci
  • ISBN: 9781452659800
  • Page: 422
  • Format: Audio CD
  • In the thirty years after the Civil War, the United States blew by Great Britain to become the greatest economic power in world history That is a well known period in history, when titans like Andrew Carnegie, John D Rockefeller, and J P Morgan walked the earth.But as Charles R Morris shows us, the platform for that spectacular growth spurt was built in the first halfIn the thirty years after the Civil War, the United States blew by Great Britain to become the greatest economic power in world history That is a well known period in history, when titans like Andrew Carnegie, John D Rockefeller, and J P Morgan walked the earth.But as Charles R Morris shows us, the platform for that spectacular growth spurt was built in the first half of the century By the 1820s, America was already the world s most productive manufacturer and the most intensely commercialized society in history The War of 1812 jump started the great New England cotton mills, the iron centers in Connecticut and Pennsylvania, and the forges around the Great Lakes In the decade after the War, the Midwest was opened by entrepreneurs In this book, Morris paints a vivid panorama of a new nation buzzing with the work of creation He also points out the parallels and differences in the nineteenth century American British standoff and that between China and America today.

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      Published :2018-08-22T00:19:11+00:00

    One thought on “The Dawn of Innovation: The First American Industrial Revolution

    1. Joshua Rigsby on said:

      Morris's task in this book is to set out the advances in industry and technology that lead to the United States surpassing Great Britain in economic superiority. On the whole he does a good job, jumping from industry to industry, comparing and contrasting the cultural and ideological differences that contributed to America's lapping of her older brother and rival. There are also places when Morris gets bogged down in the specificity of the products and machines of the era. Describing with extrem [...]

    2. Jim on said:

      usatoday/story/money/bSome quick notes and Factoids to remind myself what I learned. (Work in Process)3 stupendous and strongly reinforcing innovations in Politics, in the economy and in social relations occurred in the US between 1820-30.1)Universal white male suffrage came into effect throughout the country, with voter turnouts in the 80% for a wide range of offices2)Wide spread of mechanized, large-scale production occurred in the US3) Political and Economic Power shifted away from a small we [...]

    3. Martin on said:

      I was surprised how much I loved this book! I was basically looking for something to fill in my gaps in knowledge of 19th Century history, and was expecting this to be informative but dry. Instead, I couldn't put it down. We get histories of the major players in the American industrial revolution, what they innovated and what effect their mass production had on society. I learned about company towns that sprang up in Massachusetts, New York and Ohio. The author quotes (often British) observers o [...]

    4. David Kopec on said:

      History, Economics, Invention Manual, Confused?Do books need to fit into neat little categories for a store's shelf? Morris doesn't think so. This genre defying volume is filled to the brink with the innovations of 19th century America. Is the focus of the book explaining the innovations themselves, their impact on society, how they came about, or the men behind them? It's not really clear, since Morris goes into detail about all three. In some cases, excruciating detail."The Dawn of Innovation" [...]

    5. Michael Clifford on said:

      Nice read concerning the early phases of the industrial revolution in the United States. Of particular interest is the comparison of the US vs. Great Britain in this same period. The US focused on mass production and less focus on labor. The net result was a huge increase in output which eventually eclipsed Great Britain.

    6. Eric Gardner on said:

      In Dawn of Innovation Charles Morris argues that America’s economic dominance wasn’t driven by science, technology or ingenuity, but our commitment to mass production (scale). “The dominating American characteristic across all major industries,” he writes, “was the push for scale—adapting the production methods, the use of machinery, and the distribution to suit the product.” Viewing the world through this lenses reveals two myths; applying it to modern times illuminates the bigges [...]

    7. Teresa on said:

      Pretty good for non fiction read. I think the audio version would be better. Good plane read.

    8. Converse on said:

      I enjoyed this book about the beginnings of industrialization in the United States. The author, Charles R. Morris, concentrates on the period before the Civil War. He gives examples from several different industries, including clock-making, textiles, iron and steel, making sewing machines, and firearms. He compares the industrialization process in the United States with that in Great Britain, and in the final chapter briefly discusses the growth of China in relation to American prospects, a deve [...]

    9. Marks54 on said:

      This book is an effort at a popular focused economic history of the US in the 19th century. Morris has a particular case to make – that the surge in US economic performance from the late 19th century and well into the current one was based on fundamental developments that promoted scale and scope economies in US supply and distribution capabilities, combined with well known influences as economic culture, innovation, political economy, and the role of great plutocrats such as Morgan, Rockefell [...]

    10. Peter on said:

      Through the battles with Britain on the Great Lakes, a fight of weaponry and shipbuilding, to the introduction of basic manufacturing in the US, Morris ties the innovations of the past to American prosperity and achievements over Great Britain in the 1800s. While seeming incapable to the Britains and pursuing some ideas they'd all but written off, the Americans seized on advancements in textiles, clock-making, weaponry, steel manufacture, &c &c. quietly re-engineering ideas from across t [...]

    11. Pam on said:

      What a great wonky book full of details about the industrial revolution in the US. Morris isn't afraid of boring you with machining details, pattern making, and the other details that consumed the inventors and entrepreneurs of the time. His argument is in that the US went from being a sleepy colony to a full blown industrial power in a few short decades mainly because Americans created the first mass consumer society (thanks to universal male suffrage, burgeoning middle class and the desire for [...]

    12. Al on said:

      I don't know why the book is called The Dawn of Innovation; it's actually a wide-ranging, fascinating history of the development of mass production and precision manufacturing in the United States in the nineteenth century. As such, it's a wealth of interesting detail, clear explanations -- with illustrations -- of key advances, and reader-friendly writing. It ranges from a discussion of the race to develop naval power on the Great Lakes in the War of 1812 all the way to an analysis of the probl [...]

    13. Lockett on said:

      Growing up in New England, having been a small history museum director for 23 years, much of the territory covered was familiar, but the concept of American as the first middle class nation was interesting. How he explained the various phases of industrial growth in different industrial areas that allowed the US to outproduce Great Britain and Germany by WW I was interesting. The follow up chapter on China now challenging us and how that might play out was an added bonus. A clearly written easy [...]

    14. Martin Hogan on said:

      I am quite pleased with the first half of the book. After the Civil War era was approached, the detail in an emerging industrialization diminished. Considering how the setup for industry was presented, I was ready for all industries the author chose to be dissected in the same manner. Yep, I rarely say this "it could have been three times longer". A great companion to Daniel Walker Howe's "What Hath God Wrought".

    15. Frederick Bingham on said:

      This book traces the rise of industrialism mainly in the US. It goes into many different industries, guns, railroads, steamships, steel, textiles, etc. This is more of a book for historians, but was interesting enough to get all the way through. There is a final chapter on the rise of China which I found off-putting.

    16. Gordon Fowler on said:

      This is a fun book filled with lots of anecdotes around American Economic History during the early 19th century. The heroes of this book are the mechanical engineers who figure out how to mass produce goods for the benefit of an increasingly prosperous middle class.

    17. Rhett Carter on said:

      Decent read. The last two or three chapters are important.

    18. Antonio on said:

      excellent look at the different industries of 19th century America and how they compare to Great Britain.

    19. Michael on said:

      more about the era prior to the industrial revolution very little on 1880 -1910. Well written by an experienced writer.

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