Centuries Of Meditations

Thomas Traherne

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Centuries Of Meditations

Centuries Of Meditations This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original Due to its age it may contain imperfections such as marks notations marginalia and flawed pages Because we believe this work is c

  • Title: Centuries Of Meditations
  • Author: Thomas Traherne
  • ISBN: 9781430472506
  • Page: 345
  • Format: Paperback
  • This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world s literature in affordable, high quality, modernThis scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world s literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work.

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      Published :2018-05-18T21:28:06+00:00

    One thought on “Centuries Of Meditations

    1. Briana on said:

      Beautiful words. Equally beautiful thoughts. In a way, I find Traherne to be the "same but totally different" counterpart to Emerson. They both talk about the self and nature and God and how beautiful everything is, but with Traherne I never feel like he's looking down on anyone. He just really loves what God has made. I also love how Traherne tells us to enjoy what God has given to us as a way of entering into communion with God and embracing our identities of being made in His image. God loves [...]

    2. Douglas Wilson on said:

      Really enjoyed reading through this -- although it would be difficult to summarize the overall flow. That said, there are many striking phrases and observations that were a real blessing. Traherne wrote in the 17th century, and is a somewhat obscure writer. Some years ago a student used him in his thesis and put me on to him, and I have been chipping away at this book since. Once I started reading him, I noticed others noticing him -- Lewis does, for example.

    3. Glenn Crouch on said:

      I must admit that I found this book (reading each entry in each century as a devotional) to be a bit frustrating at times. I just couldn't always get what was being said. Maybe my imagination is not sufficient. I also struggled at times to match the God being talked about with the God of the Bible, though of course other times it was spot on.My motivation for reading this was That C S Lewis liked this book. But of course he was a far greater scholar of Literature than I.So some worthwhile materi [...]

    4. Fred Sanders on said:

      I added this to the Torrey curriculum on a lark several years ago, and it's been the gift that keeps on giving. Every reading is a delight. The Kessinger reprint is barely adequate, let's have a new one.

    5. Charles Rouse on said:

      It's just absurd that classics like this go out of print. Grr. I have the Cosimo edition from 2007, maybe you can look on ABE Books, a book lovers internet source. Heavenly. Traherne is heavenly. You don't have to be a Christian or to believe in God to appreciate Traherne, but Traherne was ordained in the Church of England. He evidently believed that God loved so he gave us a beautiful world full of useful and wonderful things. He also believed that if we don't enjoy the life that God gave us an [...]

    6. Chad on said:

      I picked this book up when I found a reference to it in the letters of C. S. Lewis ("For meditative and devotional reading (a little bit at a time, more like sucking a lozenge more than eating a slice of bread) I suggest the Imitation of Christ (astringent) and Traherne's Centuries of Meditations (joyous)"), and I wasn't disappointed. I had a hard time following it all the time (probably because I was "eating [it] like a slice of bread), but I ended up writing a one-line summary of each meditati [...]

    7. Fazackerly Toast on said:

      well I'll be honest I enjoyed it but it was probably way over my head me being just a plain old City accountant and not a Christian visionary cum mystic

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