The Bargain from the Bazaar: A Family's Day of Reckoning in Lahore

Haroon K. Ullah

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The Bargain from the Bazaar: A Family's Day of Reckoning in Lahore

The Bargain from the Bazaar A Family s Day of Reckoning in Lahore Awais Reza is a shopkeeper in Lahore s Anarkali Bazaar the largest open market in South Asia whose labyrinthine streets teem with shoppers rickshaws and cacophonous music But Anarkali s exuberant hu

  • Title: The Bargain from the Bazaar: A Family's Day of Reckoning in Lahore
  • Author: Haroon K. Ullah
  • ISBN: 9781610391665
  • Page: 292
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Awais Reza is a shopkeeper in Lahore s Anarkali Bazaar the largest open market in South Asia whose labyrinthine streets teem with shoppers, rickshaws, and cacophonous music.But Anarkali s exuberant hubbub cannot conceal the fact that Pakistan is a country at the edge of a precipice In recent years, the easy sociability that had once made up this vibrant community has beenAwais Reza is a shopkeeper in Lahore s Anarkali Bazaar the largest open market in South Asia whose labyrinthine streets teem with shoppers, rickshaws, and cacophonous music.But Anarkali s exuberant hubbub cannot conceal the fact that Pakistan is a country at the edge of a precipice In recent years, the easy sociability that had once made up this vibrant community has been replaced with doubt and fear Old timers like Awais, who inherited his shop from his father and hopes one day to pass it on to his son, are being shouldered aside by easy money, discount stores, heroin peddlers, and the tyranny of fundamentalists.Every night before Awais goes to bed, he plugs in his cell phone and hopes He hopes that the city will not be plunged into a blackout, that the night will remain calm, that the following morning will bring affluent and happy customers to his shop and, most of all, that his three sons will safely return home Each of the boys, though, has a very different vision of their, and Pakistan s, future.The Bargain from the Bazaar the product of eight years of field research is an intimate window onto ordinary middle class lives caught in the maelstrom of a nation falling to pieces It s an absolutely compelling portrait of a family at risk from a violently changing world on the outside and a growing terror from within.

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      Published :2018-08-27T01:58:20+00:00

    One thought on “The Bargain from the Bazaar: A Family's Day of Reckoning in Lahore

    1. Anum Shaharyar on said:

      A few months back, I bestowed on H.M. Naqvi’s 2009 novel Home Boy the honour of being the most patronizing book I had ever read. In retrospect, I can see I might have been too hasty in my judgment, because Home Boy has now been delegated to the second position. In its place stands The Bargain From the Bazaar by Haroon K. Ullah, a book filled with such ridiculously high levels of bad storytelling, superior condescension and lack of character building that it seems to take bad writing to new, as [...]

    2. Melanie on said:

      First, I don't really like the title. The Bazaar is a significant part of the setting, but there's no real bargain that's struck there. And while there's a significant day in the life of the family at the end, I'm not sure that was really the day of reckoning for them.So, titling issues aside.This is a non-fiction book about a Pakistani family in which the 3 grown sons take very different paths as adults. I learned a little about the history of Pakistan and was able to sympathize with most of th [...]

    3. آدم زمین زاد on said:

      This is a classic guide how not to write about Pakistan, its culture and society. First i didn't understand the genre of this book. I randomly started it as novel. I was expecting some good or unique narrative. The introduction states high claims of field research and in depth interviews with all kind people form street vendors to taliban handlers to agency people. But the information presented is so superficial, so ordinary, so cliched that it seems the author never visited Pakistan. This book [...]

    4. Kenneth Pham on said:

      I didn't know how I would like this book. The initial chapters were awkward as each were introduced with a history lesson of sorts. Overall the plot was average. The novel obviously had a point to make but it would have been much more persuasive if the story spoke for itself, instead of the commentary was forcefully integrated. However the true flaws of this book lie within its characters and the dialogue. And the dialogue, itself contributes to the flatness of the characters. Each seemed to hav [...]

    5. Laura on said:

      Really enjoyed reading about this family in Pakistan. The author says that the story was culled from years of research and interviews, and it certainly has feels true-to-life, but I wonder how he got some of his information. In any case, this portrayal was interesting and engaging.

    6. Armaghan Behlum on said:

      Bargain from the Bazaar is an interesting story told in a very uninteresting way. While reading it, I did empathize with the characters and worried about them because I knew that the story was partially real. However, the author manages to squander that easy, basic connection you should feel to characters based on real people by writing them as if they were cardboard talking points. All emotional reactions are brushed over to keep moving forward with the story and the dialogue is awkward and rep [...]

    7. Nudrat on said:

      Creative nonfiction that focuses on explaining the plight of us non-Western folk to the Western audience has been in fashion for a long time. There was Three Cups of Tea, which charts one white man’s mission to singlehandedly save Afghanistan and Pakistan by opening schools. There was Behind the Beautiful Forevers, a commercial and critical success about the residents of a Mumbai slum. The Bargain from the Bazaar written by Haroon K. Ullah is the latest work written in the same vein, albeit wi [...]

    8. Stephanie on said:

      This book provides interesting perspective on Pakistani history and the rise of Islamic extremism through the madrassa, but the dialogue was stilted and I found myself wishing it was a long-form Atlantic article, not a full-length attempt at creative nonfiction.

    9. Mandy on said:

      This is a powerful and moving story of a Pakistani family living in Lahore and trying to make sense of the political and societal upheavals in that most turbulent of countries, contemporary Pakistan. Awais Reza is a shopkeeper in the city’s Anarkali Bazaar, part of a vibrant community which is gradually being eroded by forces from both within and without. He hopes to pass on his jewellery business to his sons just as his own father passed it on to him, but the world is changing, and not one of [...]

    10. Murtaza on said:

      This book is the true story of a middle-class Pakistani family in contemporary Lahore whose lives are suddenly upended by the political turmoil which has swept over the country in recent years. While this is a nonfiction work the story is essentially constructed as a novel and offers a great insight into the lives of ordinary Pakistanis, beyond the headlines.The book is enthralling, an absolute pageturner, I finished it in just two sittings and was thoroughly entertained and moved by it in the e [...]

    11. Joseph on said:

      I received this book as an advance copy from First reads. Based on the true story of the Reza family of Lahore,Pakistan, The Bargain from the Bazaar offers up a glimpse of life for an ordinary family in the midst of political turmoil, fundamentalist furor, and the constant threat of terrorist attacks. Within the story, one receives somewhat of an abridged history lesson on Pakistan, as well as an understanding of what the Pakistani people feel, believe and yearn for, from many different sides, [...]

    12. Melinda on said:

      I received an ARC through .---I would give it 3.5 stars. I just finished this book this morning. All I can say is wow. The first portion of the book was filled with some background information of the history and politics in Pakistan. They were interesting but a little confusing to try and follow and the transition between this and the Reza family's story was a little abrupt.The rest of the book was mostly told from the perspectives of the Reza family and quite honestly they are all fascinating i [...]

    13. Kara on said:

      The Bargain from the Bazaar: A Family's Day of Reckoning in Lahore is a poignant and evocative story of a family living in modern day Pakistan. Set against the bustling backdrop of the Anarkali bazaar, Ullah conveys the fear, and struggle of the Reza family who represent an amalgam of typical Pakistani concerns: making enough money to stay in the middle class, pressures from Islamic extremists, love for Allah, gaining an education, fear of terrorist attacks. Ullah touches on the history and poli [...]

    14. Jennifer on said:

      I was really hoping to like this novel. The premise sounded very intriguing, a great way to portray a window into the everyday life of another culture. It started off well but was hard to get into. It was a bit of a slog actually. The characters were well-drawn and unique, but there was a sort of didactic heaviness to the message the author is clearly trying to portray. I don't like being told outright to feel a certain way. I did keep going though and finished it. I particularly liked the descr [...]

    15. Eapen Chacko on said:

      Mr. Ullah spent eight years interviewing Pakistanis from different regional, economic and social groups in order to understand Pakistan as it is to every day, middle class people, as opposed to the power elite we read about in the newspapers. He put many of the stories and the characters into a narrative about the Reza family and their jewelry stall in the Anarkali market in Lahore. The plot is like a mystery and unfolds like a movie to a climax that is a vehicle for Mr. Ullah's take on the 'mod [...]

    16. Vlad Wielbut on said:

      This book presented a somewhat engaging story, so I read it quickly and with considerable interest, but the writing was so bad that I feel embarrassed for having finished it. The dialogues were especially jarring. People not so much spoke to one another, as uttered pronouncements, even in the most mundane of situation. Nobody speaks that way. It was so unnatural, it sent shivers down my spine. If felt like a book written as a class assignment in high-school by a B- student. I'm planning to avoid [...]

    17. Deborah Hartman on said:

      I enjoyed this book and learned from it, but I want to know more - about Pakistan's history, culture and politics. I think that alone is the sign of a good book. It is said to be based on extensive research and interviews, and true events. But I wonder how much is true, and how much was creative license. There are some parts of the story that are not fully developed, but overall it is a fascinating and fast-paced book. I agree with the reviewer who wondered about the significance of the title.

    18. Nada on said:

      Amidst the political and economic chaos of Pakistan are people like the Reza family attempting to lead an ordinary life just like the rest of us. The Bargain from the Bazaar does an excellent job of providing a story behind the headlines that Pakistan seems to be in so often these days. This book makes it personal - behind any headlines are so many stories like this one if we but take the time to understand.Read my complete review at: memoriesfrombooks/2014*** Reviewed for GoodReads First Reads [...]

    19. LaVida on said:

      This is an incredibly fascinating insight into the inner workings of life through the eyes of a Pakistani family.This true story is extremely well written and a gripping read. It is probably the best book I have read in this genre ever! (no joke) I was enthralled from the very first paragraph!This book has some amazing reviews from highly credible sources, and they are very well deserved. Highly recommended!!

    20. Serge on said:

      My reaction to this valiant effort by Mr. Ullah is 3.5 stars.(Free copy received from the author & .) The first third of this relatively brief story left me more confused than enlightened, but the remaining two thirds were excellent. Mr. Ullah has a reasonably deft touch describing modern day family life and politics in Pakistan.

    21. Adrian on said:

      I received this from a good reads giveaway. I liked reading about everyday life in Pakistan and what a family goes through day to day in the country. The beginning was slow, and as it picked up, the plot got hot real fast then cooled just as quickly. Glad I read it, but not the best written book.

    22. Kim on said:

      I received this one from Netgalley, but I wasn't able to fairly rate or review this book. There were too many formatting errors for me to read through it. It was missing multiple letter combinations such as "th", "ll", "ff", "ffl", etc.

    23. Cheryl Turoczy hart on said:

      I enjoyed this simply told story of life in Pakistan, post-9/11. The fact that the author is a Whitman grad made it even more enjoyable. The subtitle, "A Family's Day of Reckoning in Lahore" states the biographical aspect of the story but the insight into the jihadist mindset was enlightening.

    24. Michelle Morgan on said:

      WEll I thought it was an excellent book. The main players could have been a bit more fleshed out but on the whole I truly enjoyed reading about a Pakistani family. It was an eye opener to read about how other ppl live in this world.

    25. Kadri on said:

      A realistic and somewhat tragic story of a family living in Lahore, Pakistan. There are two intertwined stories, one of the family, and the other of some suicide bombers. It's well written and shows how even the best families can have black sheep among them.

    26. Bharath Ballamudi on said:

      Book serves to narrate the average family life in Pakistan in the times when insurgency was brewing. I particularly took liking for the characters and the way their lives go about. It's a nice read overall.

    27. Lisa Napoli on said:

      Not sure how he reconstructed the fundamentalist scenes but aside from that this is a fantastic insight into one family in Pakistan. A great documentary.

    28. Marian on said:

      excellent book - I like historical fiction that creates a story around real political issues.

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