The Not So Big Life: Making Room for What Really Matters

Sarah Susanka

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The Not So Big Life: Making Room for What Really Matters

The Not So Big Life Making Room for What Really Matters Have you ever found yourself asking Is this all there is to life Or wondering if this bigger life you have created is actually a better life And do you wonder how it all got so out of control In her

  • Title: The Not So Big Life: Making Room for What Really Matters
  • Author: Sarah Susanka
  • ISBN: 9781400065318
  • Page: 444
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Have you ever found yourself asking, Is this all there is to life Or wondering if this bigger life you have created is actually a better life And do you wonder how it all got so out of control In her groundbreaking bestseller The Not So Big House, architect Sarah Susanka showed us a new way to inhabit our houses by creating homes that were better not bigger Now, in ThHave you ever found yourself asking, Is this all there is to life Or wondering if this bigger life you have created is actually a better life And do you wonder how it all got so out of control In her groundbreaking bestseller The Not So Big House, architect Sarah Susanka showed us a new way to inhabit our houses by creating homes that were better not bigger Now, in The Not So Big Life, Susanka takes her revolutionary philosophy to another dimension by showing us a new way to inhabit our lives.Most of us have lives that are as cluttered with unwanted obligations as our attics are cluttered with things The bigger is better idea that triggered the explosion of McMansions has spilled over to give us McLives For many of us, our ability to find the time to do what we want to do has come to a grinding halt Now we barely have time to take a breath before making the next call on our cell phone, while at the same time messaging someone else on our Blackberry Our schedules are chaotic and overcommitted, leaving us so stressed that we are numb, yet we wonder why we cannot fall asleep at night.In The Not So Big Life, Susanka shows us that it is possible to take our finger off the fast forward button, and to our surprise we find how effortless and rewarding this change can be We do not have to lead a monastic life or give up the things we love In fact, the real joy of leading a not so big life is discovering that the life we love has been there the entire time Through simple exercises and inspiring stories, Susanka shows us that all we need to do is make small shifts in our day subtle movements that open our minds as if we were finally opening the windows to let in fresh air.The Not So Big Life reveals that form and function serve not only architectural aims but life goals as well Just as we can tear down interior walls to reveal space, we can tear down our fears and assumptions to open up new possibilities The result is that we quickly discover we have all the space and time we need for the things in our lives that really matter But perhaps the greatest reward is the discovery that small changes can yield enormous results In her elegant, clear style, Susanka convinces us that less truly is much .From the Hardcover edition.

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      Published :2019-02-26T03:03:34+00:00

    One thought on “The Not So Big Life: Making Room for What Really Matters

    1. Ginger on said:

      I really wanted to like this book. I'm a big fan of the Susanka architectural books and I hoped to find something accessible in the same way about life remodelling. Unfortunately, while there is some good stuff in the book, it's couched in language and a sense of privilege that left me uncomfortable and annoyed.If you're a well-off upper-middle-class or wealthy reader, the book may help, but if you've ever rolled your eyes at the concept that you make your own reality (especially if you equate t [...]

    2. Zjourney on said:

      What mixed bag! I thought I'd never get through it. Finally I just gave in & let the words wash by, whether I registered them or not. There a lot of good stuff in it, most excellent Rumi quotes - - & also just a lot of stuff.

    3. Milissa on said:

      Now I know why this book has been on the bookshelf for so long. I started it a couple times, got bored, and re-shelved the book. When I picked it up last week, I was determined to get through it. I really wanted to like the book. But I didn't. I forced myself to read the whole book looking for at least some part of it that I lovedor even likedbut that part never came.I really like the concept/title "the not so big life." I strive to live my life this waybut I guess the definition of "not so big" [...]

    4. Nicole on said:

      It's fine, but really there isn't much information here that you can't find in better self-help books. Her architecture metaphors are cute, but don't necessarily add to the message. I don't think the worksheets she has you do are all that helpful just because they don't:- cause you take action- provide any discussion when you're finished (other than your own)Really, what is the point of spending 20 minutes filling out a worksheet on your preferences if there aren't follow up questions or an acti [...]

    5. Katie on said:

      In “The Not So Big Life,” Sarah Susanka tosses out hooks, but before the fish can bite she drowns them in more worms than there is water. She seems like an interesting soul, but her best ideas are buried in a kind of rambling that feels as if I picked up her journals and not a concise final draft of a self-help book. She needs an evaporator to make a few precious drops of syrup out of her sugar water ideas. Valuable reminders conceal themselves among the pages: to give self-reflection, medit [...]

    6. Laura on said:

      I think I've only read a very small handful of self help books in my life, and I have a bit of an aversion to their format. They start out telling you about the problem, then move on to an overview telling you how they will teach you how to overcome it (but not actually telling you anything yet, just that they WILL tell you). The next step always seems so flimsy, where they actually tell you the secret of life, the universe, and everything. Or whatever it was they promised you. Only it's usually [...]

    7. Nancy on said:

      I really enjoy her books like The Not-So-Big House about designing for living, but this is a pass. There's some good stuff about slowing down and doing what matters in life instead of just being busy. But that's buried in too much other content. Mostly, it's overly wordy and overly woo-woo on the life inventory stuff.

    8. Kimberly on said:

      reads more like a journal of how she "got" the meaning of life. It's been done before and by more experienced writers. Couldn't finish.

    9. Salina Christaria on said:

      I listened to the audio book version shortly after resigning from an eleven year career due to severe job stress. It provided exactly what I needed at exactly the right time - a blueprint for remodeling my life from being a worker bee to into living a life that reflects my passions and my dreams. As I embark on the exciting adventure of aligning myself to my own unfolding, I can see that the author is right. All that is required is our presence. It is only when we choose to slow down and learn h [...]

    10. Wendi on said:

      This is a book about organizing your life. Who and what do you want and need in your life. Who and what do you not want. How you can make those decisions, see in new ways, and accept the flow of energies around you. More spiritual than I wanted but did most of the exercises in each chapter anyway. I guess I read the title too literally and was looking for home organization ideas.

    11. Linda on said:

      I loved her books on architecture. I only read this one for a book club. I wouldn't have read it otherwise.

    12. Sharon Pisacreta on said:

      Architect Sarah Susanka has spent her professional life designing beautiful residential spaces. During a time when McMansions were springing up in every subdivision, Susanka’s recommendation to “build better, not bigger” resonated with those looking for a more sustainable and harmonious home space. Her 1998 book 'The Not So Big House' introduced her architectural philosophy and quickly became a bestseller.It seemed a natural progression for Susanka to next explore how we live our lives in [...]

    13. Chinarut Ruangchotvit on said:

      This is by far one of the best books i've read in quite some time - i liked it so much, I just had to savior every moment and was a bit sad when it ended! Sarah is well-known architect and her expertise chanelling the wisdom of architecture into creating a life by design is absolutely phenomenal. Not only did I develop an appreciation for architecture in ways I had not imagined, she is a "cultural translator" helping you take on a "renovation" of your own life. I loved the stories and anecdotes [...]

    14. Martha on said:

      I’ve thought a lot about writing a spiritual memoir: telling about my spiritual path and sharing insights. Now I don’t need to! This book is categorized as a how-to book, but the memoir aspect of it is what makes it so accessible. The principles she writes about are identical to the ones we work with in our yoga practice, so if you’re looking for a way to ‘make room for what really matters’ in your busy life, this book is wonderful.I could write reams about my experience reading this b [...]

    15. Tryn on said:

      The Not So Big Life makes my list of top 10 self-help books. Susanka develops an extended architectural metaphor for remodeling your life. Her advice is simple but not easy: slow down, do one thing at a time, be present in your own life by asking yourself "What is now?" every fifteen minutes. I need these reminders because there is constant pressure in my life to get more done in a day, multi-task, and keep a running to do list in my head instead of enjoying the task I'm actually doing. She teac [...]

    16. Erin on said:

      I love Sarah Susanka's home design books, but I was a little surprised to learn she had also written a book that fell into the spiritual journey/self-help arena (or "conduct of life," as it's cataloged in my library). I was feeling the need for some inspiration, so I checked it out last fall when I was home sick for a while.Susanka applies principles of great home design to create guidelines on how to live one's life, and what she has to say fits in well with other books like The Four Agreements [...]

    17. Kathryn on said:

      okay. If you know me, you know that it is RARE that I cant finish a book, once Ive started reading it. This one was so painful, I had to stop reading at chapter two.Uh, kind of a no brainer, but architects do not make good self-help pseudo-psychologist gurus.I am totally a member of the susanka architectural cult Ive completely bought into the environmental psychology of placemaking and the importance of structuring your home properly to maximize the quality of domestic life.That said, I found s [...]

    18. Kathleen on said:

      I took notes, since I'm trying to minimize the amount of books on my bookshelf. I don't want the amount of books to be overwhelming. I did not enjoy the book as much as I thought I should. I did not enjoy it that much because there were a staggering amount of metaphorical commentary on architectural themes, vocabulary, and concepts. I did not understand the architectural ideas in order to apply it to our personal lives. My poor mind could not compute it very well, and I feel I am relatively inte [...]

    19. Lisa on said:

      Sarah Susanka uses the metaphor of remodeling your house to remodeling your life. She's a famous architect who has written many books about remodeling. The lessons she has learned about life and space and a well lived life are encorporated into the book as well as many personal stories. There are so many things in this book that resonate with me. So many brilliant concepts. The book is so rich for finding the real meaning in life. In doing some of the exercises she asks you to do I found myself [...]

    20. Pamela on said:

      This is the second in architect Sarah Susanka’s “Not So Big” series, following “The Not So Big House.” In this outing, Susanka discusses making room in your life for what really matters. She shows us how to declutter our lives much as she decluttered our homes in her last book. The “small” shifts in our daily lives sound small, but implementing them is, of course, problematic. However, the changes do make sense, and if they work for you, you will have the time to do the things you [...]

    21. Suzy on said:

      I truly enjoyed this book, though it was heady!! I LOVE The Not so Big House. While I expected this book to deal more with the idea of living a simpler life, I have to say I did get quite a bit out of it.As one who is fairly "traditional" in my faith (at least my faith language) I had to translate a few things Susanka said into language I understood, but in many cases she was spot on and agreed with other LIFE books I have read recently.This isn't a "sit and read it in a week" book. Nor is it a [...]

    22. Allison on said:

      Being generous with 3 starsThe book started off well but she really started losing me toward the middle (or earlier, hard to tell with the audiobook). The practical ideas of stepping back from situations is great and so useful. The new-agey philosophya little, no a lot much. I'm not sure where the author gets her credibility. She's an architect, but apart from the beginning, I didn't find that expertise at all relevant to what she was saying. This is basically a memoir of her journey to equilibr [...]

    23. Linda on said:

      Not just another self-help book, this one is written by an architect who uses designing and building a house as a metaphor for making a beautiful and satisfying life.Lots of good advice about how to get clear on what is really important and how to get rid of the rest, leaving plenty of open space for good things to come into your life.She advises keeping an 'owner's manual' for your life, writing down what works for you, your passions, ideas, favorite inspirational quotations, and dreams. The No [...]

    24. Annette on said:

      After reading her Not So Big House series, prompted by a home re-design with a new family addition, I was struck by Sarah's life philosophies. My husband I have always believed that we should use the space we have more effectively and avoid at all cost the desire to move into a McMansion just because we have acquired more "stuff." I grew up in the San Francisco Bay Area where land is expensive, and homes are mostly small. If everyone there can live happily and properly, then so can we, even if t [...]

    25. Heather Koshiol on said:

      This book is one of my favorite change-your-perspective books. Without sounding new-agey, Susanka discusses topics like meditation, manifestation and detachment. I could really relate to her real-life examples and her architectural descriptions. Reading this book and doing the exercises helped me think differently about how I spend my time and energy as I go through my days. (I do agree with another reviewer who mentions a lack of discussion following exercises. Susanka's book starts out with a [...]

    26. Annie on said:

      Much like any self-help book, the key is to change one's own attitude. Susanka uses an interesting metaphor of a house remodeling (she is an architect) and she provides a step by step template which could be helpful. Very "Buddhist" -- her main ideas involve creating a "watcher" to recognize and think about reactive life patterns and incorporating daily meditation. Repetitiveness and overgeneralizations were sometimes annoying, but the acknowledgment of the difficulty and resistance to change he [...]

    27. Andrea on said:

      I have enjoyed her Not So Big House books, and I really like this one so far.The most valuable part of this book for me were the instructions on making a binder to help you discover what really matters in your life. At the end of each chapter Susanka gives you a writing or thinking assignment to help you delve deeper into what makes you who you are. There are also mini assignments scattered throughout the text. She covers everything from dream interpretation to listing objects that you think are [...]

    28. Stormy on said:

      An architect recommending" Through simple exercises and inspiring stories, Susanka shows us that all we need to do is make small shifts in our day–subtle movements that open our minds as if we were finally opening the windows to let in fresh air.The Not So Big Life reveals that form and function serve not only architectural aims but life goals as well. Just as we can tear down interior walls to reveal space, we can tear down our fears and assumptions to open up new possibilities. The result is [...]

    29. Jessietaylortanner on said:

      I really wanted to like this book.I had a longer review nearly finished when Fiona came and Baby-Konged it into oblivion and now I do not have the energy to rewrite it all. I will summarize briefly: She should stick to what she knows, architecture. Her version of self-help is flimsy and unfounded in anything substantial. I do not feel like I need to search for the meaning of life through introspection and an unhealthy preoccupation with self. I agree with her philosophy of simplification in gene [...]

    30. Tina on said:

      So far, this books is absolutely life-changing for me. I will write more later! I am amazed at the fact that an architect wrote a book that is impacting me so much psychologically! Wow, the concept of a not so big life is so simple but yet something that has eluded me for years. UPDATE: Fantastic book. Sarah Susanka actually taught me a few things about time management and even delved into some things I would have expected from a fellow psychologist and not an architect. What insights she has in [...]

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