The Last Country Houses

Clive Aslet

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The Last Country Houses

The Last Country Houses The magnificent country houses built in Britain between and were the last monuments to a vanishing age Many of these great mammoths of domestic architecture were unsuited to the changes in e

  • Title: The Last Country Houses
  • Author: Clive Aslet
  • ISBN: 9780300029048
  • Page: 270
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The magnificent country houses built in Britain between 1890 and 1939 were the last monuments to a vanishing age Many of these great mammoths of domestic architecture were unsuited to the changes in economic and social priorities that followed the two world wars, and rapidly became extinct Those that survive, however, provide tangible evidence of the life and death if anThe magnificent country houses built in Britain between 1890 and 1939 were the last monuments to a vanishing age Many of these great mammoths of domestic architecture were unsuited to the changes in economic and social priorities that followed the two world wars, and rapidly became extinct Those that survive, however, provide tangible evidence of the life and death if an extraordinarily prosperous age.This book recounts the architectural and social history of this era, describing the clients, the architects, the styles and accoutrements of the country houses The people who could afford them the Carnegies, the Astors, the Leverhulmes had grown rich by exploiting the new economic opportunities of the age, and the houses they built in the years before the First World War reflect the desire for two contrasting ways of life The social country house was the setting for the opulent world associated with Edward VII The romantic country house was simpler, genuinely rural, for those who wanted to be in closer contact with the countryside and the vanishing rural crafts, or who wanted an idyll of the past that did not suggest the world of the motor car These traditions lost coherence after the war, and the period ended with a number of spectacular, and often eccentric, houses Some of the most remarkable were those that not replicated the look of old buildings, but used genuinely old materials and even incorporated whole Tudor buildings moved from other places.Clive Aslet writes of the immense changes in the way country houses of the period were lived in and used The shortage of servants, aggravated by the First World War, spurred numerous developments in the technology of the country house vacuum cleaners, washing machines, telephones and central heating were called upon to replace the army of servants who never returned from the trenches or the factories Interior decorators, becoming increasingly in vogue, developed the style Louis Seize into the last word in Edwardian chic Gardens came to be seen as integral to the concept of the country house and reconciled formal planning with informal planting.This fascinating world, so vividly depicted in Evelyn Waugh s Brideshead Revisited , can now be viewed from a new perspective The Last Country Houses will enlighten and entertain all those interested in glimpsing the lost life style of another age.

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      Posted by:Clive Aslet
      Published :2019-01-09T22:21:59+00:00

    One thought on “The Last Country Houses

    1. Abbey on said:

      BOTTOM LINE: Another sumptuous look at that rarefied world of the large English country house of the early 20th century, one of my favorite sorts of books to get lost in. Written commentary is a bit long and over-worked, but the over-all attitude isn't too precious, or "cute!", and there are many nice photographs. The book is itself rather large and unwieldy, and there aren't enough photos for my taste, but for those wanting a nice over-view of the period, histories of some of the more famous ar [...]

    2. Joyce on said:

      This book is filled with wonderful pictures and descriptions not only of the houses but what life was like back in the nineteenth century. Most of these old homes are gone now. I also loved seeing the floor plans of these homes. Anyone interested in homes of this period will want to read this book.

    3. ^ on said:

      What makes a house, what makes a home? Here is a delightful and fascinating text, which assisted by the magnificent archives of Country Life (244 black & white and 37 colour plates), eloquently portrays the pleasure, imagination and challenge of commissioning the building of country houses, and the considerations of architecture and decoration during a series of remarkable periods of change through war, increased social mobility, wage inflation, and technological advance. The traditional sou [...]

    4. Kim on said:

      Great story on the decline of servants and the rise of the vacuum cleaner! Lovely photos of old English mansions, kitchens, etc. And floor plans.

    5. Michael Heath-Caldwell on said:

      Very interesting book on the tail end of the big houses building spree in the UK.

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