Great Catastrophe: Armenians and Turks Come to Terms with Genocide, Memory, and Identity

Thomas de Waal

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Great Catastrophe: Armenians and Turks Come to Terms with Genocide, Memory, and Identity

Great Catastrophe Armenians and Turks Come to Terms with Genocide Memory and Identity The destruction of the Armenians of the Ottoman Empire in was a brutal mass crime that prefigured other genocides in the th century By various estimates than a million Armenians were killed

  • Title: Great Catastrophe: Armenians and Turks Come to Terms with Genocide, Memory, and Identity
  • Author: Thomas de Waal
  • ISBN: 9780199350698
  • Page: 217
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The destruction of the Armenians of the Ottoman Empire in 1915 16 was a brutal mass crime that prefigured other genocides in the 20th century By various estimates, than a million Armenians were killed and the survivors were scattered across the world Although it is now a century old, the issue of what most of the world calls the Armenian Genocide of 1915 has not beeThe destruction of the Armenians of the Ottoman Empire in 1915 16 was a brutal mass crime that prefigured other genocides in the 20th century By various estimates, than a million Armenians were killed and the survivors were scattered across the world Although it is now a century old, the issue of what most of the world calls the Armenian Genocide of 1915 has not been consigned to history It is a live and divisive political issue that mobilizes Armenians across the world, touches the identity and politics of modern Turkey, and has consumed the attention of U.S politicians for years In Great Catastrophe, the eminent scholar and reporter Thomas de Waal looks at the changing narratives and politics of the Armenian Genocide and tells the story of recent efforts by courageous Armenians, Kurds, and Turks to come to terms with the disaster as Turkey enters a new post Kemalist era The story of what happened to the Armenians in 1915 16 is well known Here we are told the much less well known story of what happened to Armenians, Kurds, and Turks in its aftermath First Armenians were divided between the Soviet Union and a worldwide diaspora, with different generations and communities of Armenians constructing new identities, while bitter intra Armenian quarrels sometimes broke out into violence In Turkey, the Armenian issue was initially forgotten and suppressed, only to return to the political agenda in the context of the Cold War, an outbreak of Armenian terrorism in the 1970s and the growth of modern identity politics in the age of genocide consciousness In the last decade, Turkey has begun to confront its taboos and finally face up to the Armenian issue New, sophisticated histories are being written of the deportations of 1915, now with the collaboration of Turkish scholars In Turkey itself there has been an astonishing revival of oral history, with tens of thousands of people coming out of the shadows to reveal a long suppressed Armenian identity However, a normalization process between the Armenian and Turkish states broke down in 2010 Drawing on archival sources, reportage and moving personal stories, de Waal tells the full story of Armenian Turkish relations since the Genocide in all its extraordinary twists and turns He strips away the propaganda to look both at the realities of a terrible historical crime and also the divisive politics of genocide it produced The book throws light not only on our understanding of Armenian Turkish relations but also of how mass atrocities and historical tragedies shape contemporary politics.

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      Published :2018-08-18T22:21:03+00:00

    One thought on “Great Catastrophe: Armenians and Turks Come to Terms with Genocide, Memory, and Identity

    1. Elyse on said:

      An exceptional researched History book --mostly about what came after of the 1915. The Armenian Genocide ranks the longest most bitter historical dispute still alive.I wanted to read this book --(having Armenian friends) --and knowing that 2015 is the 100th year anniversary since "The Great Catastrophe". Chris Bohjalian, author of "The Sandcastle Girls" was the first person to deepen my heart into this period of history. Having the opportunity to hear him speak about his own Armenian heritage ha [...]

    2. Melania 🍒 on said:

      3,8/5It’s definitely worth a read ( or a listen, in my case). I think it tells you everything you need to know about the Armenian-Turkish more than 100years conflict , especially if you’re not familiar with it beforehand. History books are perfect for me to listen to on audiobook. I feel like somebody’s telling me a story so I don’t get bored and I don’t have to listen to every single word . Thanks holly mouse for audiobooks 💙

    3. Kieran Healy on said:

      De Waal finds a way to boil down an incredibly complex narrative of war and murder. Though at times dry and bit heavy on book quotations, I found myself most times enthralled at the process these two peoples went through from 1915 to now. The title is actually interesting in that his argument mostly appears to be that using the word "genocide" is detrimental to reasonable discussion. Hence, "In the Shadow" of it. He shows that just using the politicized term Genocide turns any attempt at normali [...]

    4. Dominic on said:

      Anyone interested in English language study of the current state of the southern Caucasus owes, again, a hearty thanks to Thomas De Waal. With this newest book, ‘The Great Catastrophe’, De Waal has filled in a hole in the available history of Armenian-Turkish relations in the 20th century. By not solely focusing on the history of the Genocide (or “Great Catastrophe”) itself, and instead focusing on the post-Genocide implications for and interactions between Turkey and the Armenians, De W [...]

    5. Charles Shapiro on said:

      Gives a history of the history of the great catastrophe which is what the Armenians call the genocide against them during the first WWI. The decimation of the Armenians was horrific enough, the political fight to get this crime against humanity recognized is described as a second tragedy.

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