The Bees Her Heart, the Hive Her Belly

Benjanun Sriduangkaew

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The Bees Her Heart, the Hive Her Belly

The Bees Her Heart the Hive Her Belly None

  • Title: The Bees Her Heart, the Hive Her Belly
  • Author: Benjanun Sriduangkaew
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 213
  • Format: ebook
  • None

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      213 Benjanun Sriduangkaew
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      Posted by:Benjanun Sriduangkaew
      Published :2018-08-27T22:53:08+00:00

    One thought on “The Bees Her Heart, the Hive Her Belly

    1. Ben Babcock on said:

      The liminal space between science fiction and fantasy is one of the most fertile confluences of genre. Hard science fiction kind of wraps around on itself; when your technology becomes indistinguishable from magic, suddenly you’ve entered a world of nanotechnological fantasy. “The Bees Her Heart, the Hive Her Belly” echoes these sentiments. Benjanun Sriduangkaew, a nominee for this year’s John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer, plays in a world where technology has advanced to a poin [...]

    2. Jeff Stockett on said:

      This story is weird. Weird isn't necessarily bad, but in this case I didn't feel like it was fleshed out enough. When things are weird, they require more explaining so that the reader can understand what is going on. I felt like I was on the edge of understanding the entire time I was reading it. Things like installing some sort of prosthetic bee hive in your chest just don't make sense. How does that work? What is the motivation? Later we find out that the bee hive hides you from the internet. [...]

    3. Jon on said:

      This was weird. Weird in the way that Iron Sunrise and Mechanique: A Tale of the Circus Tresaulti were. It was a weird mix of biotech and cyberpunk. I didn't love it, but at times it brought a smile to my face.Sriduangkaew is a nominee for the 2014 Campbell Award for Best New Writer, and this story was included in the voter packet. I preferred it to Fade to Gold, but I'm still not enthused to vote for her.

    4. Chris on said:

      Compared the other works by this author, this one actually worked for me. The ending was less bleak, the characters made more sense, and the bizarre qualities were introduced less disruptively than in, for example, Silent Bridge, Pale Cascade. Reading that work first did allow me to recognize that this takes place in the same wider universe, and therefore appreciate some of the similarities and differences, but I do think this stands on its own.

    5. Tammy on said:

      I get a similar feeling from everything I read by Benjanun Sriduangkaew. I think it's beautiful, just gorgeously written and rich with layers of meaning, but ultimately I walk away thinking I didn't quite understand the point of the story. That's not a fault in Sriduangkaew's writing which, I stress, I find lovely. It's something in me that makes me unable at this time to connect with their works.

    6. Althea Ann on said:

      In a far-future, a woman traumatized by the loss of the memories of her dearest sister makes some radical decisions and joins a cult based around bizarre and dangerous bio-modification. Gradually, unexpected layers of motivation and intention are revealed. Hmm. That description makes the story sound significantly less weird than it is. It's a very odd and original story. Very good writing, but I found it a little inaccessible, emotionally, where it felt it ought to be strong.

    7. Kat on said:

      Strange, but I wound up liking it quite a lot. Some brief spoilery thoughts here:ciaracatscifi/201

    8. Jasmine on said:

      That was lovely. Again, very Thai, but in a far future where a community shares a memory (where persons can be erased from memory with a data wipe).

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