Darkness Moves: An Henri Michaux Anthology, 1927-1984

Henri Michaux David Ball

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Darkness Moves: An Henri Michaux Anthology, 1927-1984

Darkness Moves An Henri Michaux Anthology Henri Michaux defies common critical definition Critics have compared his work to such diverse artists as Kafka Goya Swift Klee and Beckett Allen Ginsberg called Michaux genius and Jorge Luis Bor

  • Title: Darkness Moves: An Henri Michaux Anthology, 1927-1984
  • Author: Henri Michaux David Ball
  • ISBN: 9780520212299
  • Page: 459
  • Format: Paperback
  • Henri Michaux defies common critical definition Critics have compared his work to such diverse artists as Kafka, Goya, Swift, Klee, and Beckett Allen Ginsberg called Michaux genius, and Jorge Luis Borges wrote that Michaux s work is without equal in the literature of our time This anthology contains substantial selections from almost all of Michaux s major works, moHenri Michaux defies common critical definition Critics have compared his work to such diverse artists as Kafka, Goya, Swift, Klee, and Beckett Allen Ginsberg called Michaux genius, and Jorge Luis Borges wrote that Michaux s work is without equal in the literature of our time This anthology contains substantial selections from almost all of Michaux s major works, most never before published in English, and allows readers to explore the haunting verbal and pictorial landscape of a twentieth century visionary.

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    One thought on “Darkness Moves: An Henri Michaux Anthology, 1927-1984

    1. Vit Babenco on said:

      Darkness Moves is an artistic and tortuous journey through human life and psyche.Life is the big fight:“Abrah! Abrah! Abrah!The foot has failed!The arm has broke!The blood has flowed!Gouge, gouge, gouge,In the big pot of his belly there’s a great secretYou hags all around us crying into your handkerchiefs,We’re amazed, amazed, amazedWe’re watching youWe’re looking for the Great Secret, too.”So Henri Michaux fights reality in order to know its Great Secret and to turn it into his absu [...]

    2. Teresa Proença on said:

      "No melão, batia um coração."Na badana deste livro há um texto, de um tal Jean-Charles Gateau, dizendo que Michaux fala à nossa intimidade e na sua obra nos reconhecemos e aos nossos medos e demónios. Creio que ainda não alcancei a (in)sanidade necessária para sentir estes poemas - que só me parecem delírios de um louco"MALDITODentro de seis meses o mais tardar, ou se calhar amanhã, estarei cego. É a minha triste, triste vida que continua.Os que me puseram neste mundo hão-de pagar-m [...]

    3. Osiris Oliphant on said:

      this book looks so good on a shelf. im a michaux man. the translations arent great. and once you read better translations its hard not to be repulsed by worser ones. when this first came out it was a rilly big deal, and publishers noticed how good the cover was and how vaguely representative the selection seemed,and said, well, there goes that hole to fill. just looking at is satisfying. mediocre? americans will be satisfied just looking at it! bam- yer roasted

    4. Rodney on said:

      Not quite a Surrealist, not really a Huxleyesque mescaline psychonaut, Michaux is one of those artistic outliers for whom the 20th century has to shift a little to fit. His writings tweak the Cartesian split with a myth of subjectivity that’s entirely plastic, with the skin between inside and outside stretched or folded in as psychic circumstances demand. His menagerie of weird creatures and imaginary lands teeter between avant-garde lit and primitive myth; in a way his writings are all versio [...]

    5. Debra on said:

      My favorite work of Michaux is a short story written as a letter: I Am Writing To You From A Distant Country, a haunting description of a place faraway and very surreal but with the human touches that make his work far from nonsense. It ends with the lovely sentence: "When will I at last see you again"

    6. Matthew on said:

      He grabowerates him and grabacks him to the ground;He rads him and rabarts him to his drat;He braddles him and lippucks him and prooks his bawdles;He tackreds him and marmeens himMandles him rasp by rip and risp by rap.And he deskinnibilizes him at the end.The other hesitates; he is bittucked, unapsed, torsed and ruined.He'll be done for soon.He mendles and marginates himself but in vain,The far-rolling hoop falls down.Abrah! Abrah! Abrah!The foot has failed!The arm has broke!The blood has flowe [...]

    7. metaphor on said:

      I write to go through myself all over. Painting, composing, writing: going through myself. That is the adventure of being alive.[…]My imaginary countries: like buffer-States for me, so as not to suffer from reality.[…]In the past, whenever I had a bad experience, I was only in difficulty for the short time I had to face it alone. As soon as I had found a character (when I had “retreated” into him), my difficulty disappeared and so did my suffering (at least the worst of it, the intolerab [...]

    8. August on said:

      Fantastic collection. A great compilation of Michaux's work. I'll certainly revisit this book often.

    9. Marcus Mennes on said:

      With Michaux we get many people, or in certain cases many creatures – see “A Few Days of My Life Among the Insects” pg. 278. In fact, Michaux is quoted as stating: “We are not made for just one self. We are wrong to cling to it…There is not one self. There are not ten selves. There is no self. ME is nothing but a position in Equilibrium” (emphasis in original).It is often speculated we humans only use 10-20% of our brain powers, albeit such claims are unreliable. With Michaux we get [...]

    10. Todd on said:

      What a charming collection. There are lots of Michaux's "Plume" stories of a befuddled buffoon that are like an existential Jacques Tati movie. I love befuddled hardluck characters, and there's a good deal of those. Also, hallucinogen inspired writings, which can, of course, be awful because of the heavy handed profundity they are imbued with, but they often avoid that and are actually quite interesting meditations in a number of areas. A surrealist-friend but with fixations and ambiances quite [...]

    11. Rauan on said:

      Lots of different types of poems here. Mostly in prose. An extremely hard-working poet. (this alone is inspiring). I imagine some of the early stuff's where Edson took encouragement for his sensibility. But this stuff rarely is just absurd in the way many of Edson's poems can.The section I enjoyed the most is late in the book. Late in Michaux's life. When he was in his last 70's. The poems about the paintings of mentally ill patients. Insane people's paintings. The poems "describe" them.

    12. Joe on said:

      Physics of savagery, delight, and the sacred?"A savagery unknown as referring us to a delight, beyond all delight to the highest as to the innermost transgression, where the ineffable remains secret, sacred."Agreed.It seems like if you want to understand the American prose poem after Edson you have to read this. Maybe.

    13. vanya klecherova on said:

      unfortunately here - books.google/books?id=9p4Q , is only an excerpt from the book. i really like what i read, it's a pity that i can't find the complete book.

    14. George on said:

      This is one of the best gatherings of Michaux's work, showing his full force and breadth.

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