Selected Writings

Henri Michaux

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Selected Writings

Selected Writings Henri Michaux is one of the great figures in modern French poetry This selection is from L Espace du Dedans which collected eight books of prose poems sketches and free verse Brilliantly translated

  • Title: Selected Writings
  • Author: Henri Michaux
  • ISBN: 9780811201056
  • Page: 380
  • Format: Paperback
  • Henri Michaux is one of the great figures in modern French poetry This selection is from L Espace du Dedans, which collected eight books of prose poems, sketches and free verse Brilliantly translated by Richard Ellmann, Michaux asks readers to join him in a fantastic world of the imagination It is a world where wry humor plays against horror where Chaplin meets Kafka Henri Michaux is one of the great figures in modern French poetry This selection is from L Espace du Dedans, which collected eight books of prose poems, sketches and free verse Brilliantly translated by Richard Ellmann, Michaux asks readers to join him in a fantastic world of the imagination It is a world where wry humor plays against horror where Chaplin meets Kafka a world of pure and rare invention.

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      Posted by:Henri Michaux
      Published :2019-02-24T06:48:50+00:00

    One thought on “Selected Writings

    1. PGR Nair on said:

      THE POETRY OF HENRI MICHAUXBorn in Belgium in 1899, Henri Michaux (1899-1984) defies common critical definition. He was educated at a Jesuit school in Brussels. He contemplated entering the priesthood then enrolled in medical school before abandoning his studies and becoming a merchant seaman. A painter as well as poet, he travelled widely in Africa and Asia and also supported himself in Paris as a teacher and secretary. His voyages inspired two travelogues on Ecuador and Asia. He finally settle [...]

    2. Justin Evans on said:

      A solid volume, which could have been improved if whoever made the selections (the translator, Richard Ellmann?) had been a bit more ruthless and aimed for excellence rather than comprehensiveness. That said, I seem to have had a very different reading experience than many others. Michaux's quasi-existentialist bits I found deeply boring, and the same can be said for the moments that verge towards surrealism. But his creation of worlds just slightly off the coast of our own was fascinating--basi [...]

    3. J.D.G. on said:

      Without being too reductionistic, I believe the oft-noted "strangeness" of Michaux lies in how he took consciousness itself as the central character of both his prose and poetry; all the refractions and reflections of ontology, all the degradations and sublimations of Earth's only self-conscious organism: the human animal.The variety of effects which Michaux draws from his central focus on consciousness keeps these barely classifiable selections from becoming an abstrusely philosphical mess. Dem [...]

    4. W.B. on said:

      Why is he not considered as great a writer as Borges? (He is.) If you don't know his drawings and other visual art, check that out too. Henri never fit anywhere. This is probably why he still fits everywhere today.

    5. Sarah on said:

      Wow, this was a really fascinating book. I love the dream-like world that Michaux has created in his works. I didn't understand it necessarily, but it created a definite mood for me. Some of it was a bit dense, though, and didn't tie into the rest of it for me, so it was difficult to get into. It probably didn't help that I started it while at the Stonecoast Writers' Conference, so I wasn't able to devote my full attention to it, and then I put it aside for about a week before finishing it. I'll [...]

    6. Cooper Renner on said:

      Strange, sometimes tedious, often remarkable writings from the first 20 years or so of Michaux's career, translated by Richard Ellman, with French and English facing each other. Surrealist, I suppose, strongly imagistic, sometimes discursive. An entrance into a world of the imagination, but closing with a non-rational treatment of life in France during World War II.

    7. Vincent Eaton on said:

      Strange, short bits, pieces and poems of odd elegance and harsh reading of human character and the thing of life.

    8. Tess on said:

      I love this book -- many of his shorter prose pieces are here -- namely, "I am writing to you from a far off country."

    9. Christina on said:

      I don't think I've ever read anything more strange. Entertaining and thought provoking, sometimes deeply emotional. Sometimes baffling

    10. Thomas Baughman on said:

      This book was an important discovery in my very early 20s.

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