Hannibal: Enemy Of Rome

Leonard Cottrell

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Hannibal: Enemy Of Rome

Hannibal Enemy Of Rome In the year B C Hannibal of Carthage faced with an opposing Roman army twice the size of his own outwitted the enemy at Cannae by means of a strategy which has become a classic of its kind As a

  • Title: Hannibal: Enemy Of Rome
  • Author: Leonard Cottrell
  • ISBN: 9780306804984
  • Page: 490
  • Format: Paperback
  • In the year 216 B.C Hannibal of Carthage, faced with an opposing Roman army twice the size of his own, outwitted the enemy at Cannae by means of a strategy which has become a classic of its kind As a result of his famous double pincer maneuver, 70,000 Roman soldiers died within the space of a few hours on a field the size of New York s Central Park Yet, as devastatinIn the year 216 B.C Hannibal of Carthage, faced with an opposing Roman army twice the size of his own, outwitted the enemy at Cannae by means of a strategy which has become a classic of its kind As a result of his famous double pincer maneuver, 70,000 Roman soldiers died within the space of a few hours on a field the size of New York s Central Park Yet, as devastating and startling as Cannae was, it was only one of a long list of incredible achievements Hannibal s fantastic 1,000 mile march across the Alps from Spain to Italy was one of the wonders of ancient times He began his hazardous journey with 90,000 infantry, 12,000 cavalry, and 37 elephants By the time he reached the Valley of the Po, than 30,000 troops and many of his elephants had perished, but he still managed to stay in Italy for sixteen years.Blending biography and military adventure, Hannibal is a portrait of a military genius who was also a highly civilized man The son of Hamilcar Barca, a famous general in his own right, Hannibal was a student of the Greek classics But his father s lifelong grudge against Rome fostered in the son a deep hatred for that Republic and a fierce determination to subdue it forever This resulted in the bloody battles of Lake Trasimene, Campania, Nole, Capua, and Zama, all of which Leonard Cottrell describes with vigor and authority In gathering material for Hannibal, Cottrell traveled the entire route that Hannibal took across the Alps, thus bringing to his account a valuable firsthand knowledge of his subject With the drama and authenticity for which he is famous, Leonard Cottrell describes Hannibal s amazing campaign a saga of victory after victory which fell just short of its ultimate goal the annihilation of Rome.

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    One thought on “Hannibal: Enemy Of Rome

    1. Hope Ann on said:

      The details of geography lost me a little bit, but the life and battles of Hannibal are a fascinating read. As history, they are interesting, but for any fantasy author who wants real-life inspiration of epic battles, Hannibal is high on the list of generals to read about.

    2. Bryn Hammond on said:

      It's an antique but I loved this book. I came away with a vivid portrait of Hannibal, a deep respect for him - I was devastated at his final defeat, although I admired his worthy enemy Scipio too. Yes, it's like a novel. Still, Cottrell quotes great swathes of Livy for you; after this I went to Livy, and found I hadn't missed much in the Cottrell. He's unashamed to tell you about Hannibal's sheer military genius, and my God how clever he is. That was what I liked him for. The man attains to wit [...]

    3. Matt on said:

      I read a book about Hannibal in middle school. I'm not sure if this is the right one, but let's just pretend it is, shall we?

    4. Jonathan on said:

      For its age a very good biography of one of the worlds greatest generals. Written in the 60's it has the benefit of being written by the author as he traveled from New Carthage to and down Italy, attempting to follow Hannibals exact route as much as possible. This lends itself to some unique view points and scholarly conclusions on the authors part. While the author is firmly in the 'Hannibal was motivated purely by revenge' camp believing the exact scene where his father makes him swear an oath [...]

    5. Squeaky on said:

      So I was weeding the biography section and seen these two copies of Hannibal: Enemy Of Rome, two very sad-looking copies. They had not been checked out since the 60s (and only twice then!), so I decided to toss one of them. Since I remembered the elephants and Hannibal from school, I decided I ought to read it, and it was good. Typically too many dates and places, but that's a historical book for you, full of facts! Mr. Cottrell's personal observations make it come alive a bit more. I appreciate [...]

    6. Jesse on said:

      Leonard Cottrell provides a historical account of Hannibal's campaigns during the Second Punic War that is concise, factual, and endowed with an imaginative flair that would otherwise only be found in fiction. He is able to put the reader into the shoes of figures both Carthaginian and Roman due to his hands-on journey along Hannibal's warpath through countrysides that are largely the same as they looked centuries ago, complete with on-the-road references to Greek historians who also took on the [...]

    7. William Powell on said:

      Hannibal was wonderful, he so nearly beat the boring Romans. Before I found this book, sometime in the mid-seventies, the only thing I knew was a that he'd taken elephants over the Alps, on the basis of which, I undertook a school project on Hannibal.Yes, it's probably unbalanced, pro-Hannibal in the extreme, but it was well written, and caught my schoolboy imagination. Who knows what happened to that first copy (library book, perhaps), but I went looking for it forty years later and found it ev [...]

    8. Max Nova on said:

      Cottrell's "Hannibal" is a decent read. Starts off a bit slow, but it really picks up in the later parts of the book. Cottrell glosses over some of the most fascinating parts of Hannibal's history, including his father and Hannibal's later escapes in the eastern Mediterranean. At times, I felt like I was reading "fan fiction," as Cottrell isn't really an academic or a historical expert, but rather a historical enthusiast. It sometimes feels as though he is trying too hard. I enjoyed most of this [...]

    9. Dr. on said:

      Short and sweet military history of the second Punic War. pretty boring and hard to finish. The descriptions of the battles were captivating but the history was very loosely put forward and many things were not mentioned, or skimmed over that deserved at least some attention. It would be a great book to start the subject with, but for a more thorough military history of the Second Punic War try Henry Dodge's "Hannibal".

    10. Jairamy on said:

      Really excellent and quick look at the life of one of the most brilliant tacticians ever

    11. Travis on said:

      I found this to be an excellent overview of the Second Punic War with vivid quotes and battle imagery. This book set me down the path to loving ancient history.

    12. Matthew on said:

      Cottrell probably exaggerates the importance of most of the battles Hannibal was in, but it makes for a very entertaining read. Reading this made me add Polybius and Livy to my "too read" column.

    13. Jen on said:

      This book gave me a new respect for this military genius and I now consider him to be one of my favorite generals. It had to be a genius to keep almighty Rome on the run for 15 years!

    14. Eli on said:

      Great book. Cottrell keeps the readers attention, and made me want to constantly read it. It is also very informative and would recommend if for anyone who is interested in Hannibal.

    15. Smith Nickerson on said:

      A little entertaining but less informative then I would have liked.

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