The Social Life of Coffee: The Emergence of the British Coffeehouse

Brian Cowan

You are here: Home - Uncategorized - The Social Life of Coffee: The Emergence of the British Coffeehouse


The Social Life of Coffee: The Emergence of the British Coffeehouse

The Social Life of Coffee The Emergence of the British Coffeehouse What induced the British to adopt foreign coffee drinking customs in the seventeenth century Why did an entirely new social institution the coffeehouse emerge as the primary place for consumption of

  • Title: The Social Life of Coffee: The Emergence of the British Coffeehouse
  • Author: Brian Cowan
  • ISBN: 9780300106664
  • Page: 329
  • Format: Hardcover
  • What induced the British to adopt foreign coffee drinking customs in the seventeenth century Why did an entirely new social institution, the coffeehouse, emerge as the primary place for consumption of this new drink In this lively book, Brian Cowan locates the answers to these questions in the particularly British combination of curiosity, commerce, and civil society CoWhat induced the British to adopt foreign coffee drinking customs in the seventeenth century Why did an entirely new social institution, the coffeehouse, emerge as the primary place for consumption of this new drink In this lively book, Brian Cowan locates the answers to these questions in the particularly British combination of curiosity, commerce, and civil society Cowan provides the definitive account of the origins of coffee drinking and coffeehouse society, and in so doing he reshapes our understanding of the commercial and consumer revolutions in Britain during the long Stuart century.Britain s virtuosi, gentlemanly patrons of the arts and sciences, were profoundly interested in things strange and exotic Cowan explores how such virtuosi spurred initial consumer interest in coffee and invented the social template for the first coffeehouses As the coffeehouse evolved, rising to take a central role in British commercial and civil society, the virtuosi were also transformed by their own invention.

    • ✓ The Social Life of Coffee: The Emergence of the British Coffeehouse || ✓ PDF Read by ↠ Brian Cowan
      329 Brian Cowan
    • thumbnail Title: ✓ The Social Life of Coffee: The Emergence of the British Coffeehouse || ✓ PDF Read by ↠ Brian Cowan
      Posted by:Brian Cowan
      Published :2018-09-02T18:38:51+00:00

    One thought on “The Social Life of Coffee: The Emergence of the British Coffeehouse

    1. Anders on said:

      Hmmm I read this for a class looking at social change through the lens of the rise of coffee & sugar. This book documents an important development, the rise of coffeehouses and the attendant shifts in the modes and meanings of coffee consumption, and specifically the public performances of such. Cowan's argument is problematic in that he grants basically all the agency in the rise of coffee culture to this supposedly fully formed class, the virtuosi, an argument I found sort of vaguely unful [...]

    2. Rebecca on said:

      "Hard at it is for us today to imagine a world without coffee, it was even ahrder for early modern Britons to imagine what a world with coffee would be like. it is a testament to their flexible imaginations that they succeeded in creating a coffee world of their own." (p. 263)I don't even like coffee and I found this study absolutely fascinating. How coffee could grow into something so fundamental in 17th century Britain, when it was unknown before, the growth of the British coffeehouse and the [...]

    3. Miriam on said:

      "To learn why and how seventeenth-century English consumers came to desire a strange new drink such as coffee can take us a long way toward understanding the origins of the consumer revolution of the long eighteenth century Curiosity, commerce, and civil society provide the three major themes through which this book explores the rise of coffee and coffeehouses."

    4. Sarah Hoffman on said:

      This is a pretty in-depth economic and social history of coffee and proves my point - I'll read anything if it has food in it. It's actually a pretty easy read though and I learned some interesting things. I recommend this one.

    5. Orlando on said:

      Interesting but dense and unnecessarily longInteresting summary of the adoption of coffee in British life and the subsequent rise of coffee houses. But the text was pretty dry and the book was longer than what it needed to be to get across its core ideas.

    6. Jeff on said:

      Ok, it is not really about coffee, but rather a spirit of adventure crossed by moderately rebellious college students blended with professional scholars and the social mores that grew alongside the loosely defined coffeehouse.

    7. Jon on said:

      Really entertaining and interesting study on the origins of the coffeehouse in Britain.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *