Coercion, Capital, and European States, A.D. 990-1992

Charles Tilly

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Coercion, Capital, and European States, A.D. 990-1992

Coercion Capital and European States A D This is at once an account and an explanation of the evolution of European states during the present millennium The central problem addressed by the author concerns the great variety in the kinds of s

  • Title: Coercion, Capital, and European States, A.D. 990-1992
  • Author: Charles Tilly
  • ISBN: 9781557863683
  • Page: 429
  • Format: Paperback
  • This is at once an account and an explanation of the evolution of European states during the present millennium The central problem addressed by the author concerns the great variety in the kinds of state that have prevailed in Europe since AD 990.Professor Tilly shows how interactions between the wielders of power on the one hand and the manipulators of capital on theThis is at once an account and an explanation of the evolution of European states during the present millennium The central problem addressed by the author concerns the great variety in the kinds of state that have prevailed in Europe since AD 990.Professor Tilly shows how interactions between the wielders of power on the one hand and the manipulators of capital on the other resulted in three state formations each of which prevailed over long periods tribute taking empires, systems of fragmented sovereignty, and national states.

    Coercion, Capital, and European States, AD Coercion, Capital, and European States, AD is a book by the American political scientist Charles Tilly The central theme of the book is state formation Tilly writes about the complex history of European state formation from the Middle Ages to the s a thousand year time span. Coercion, Capital, and European States Summary Notes Mar , Coercion, Capital, and European States to The book is an attempt to invent simple symmetry in complex events concerns The history and dynamics of collective action Process of urbanization The formation of national states Capital, Coercion, and Postcommunist States Capital, Coercion, and Postcommunist States is a history of postcommunist Poland and Russia as seen through the lens of the state s struggle to extract revenue Gerald M Easter is the foremost expert on these developments, and he has crafted a fascinating narrative to carry his penetrating analysis of these countries trajectories. Coercion, Capital and European States, A.D Coercion, Capital, and European States charts a grand theory of history that attempts to explain why Europe in the late th century looks like it does, a fairly uniform sprawl of nation state social democracies, as opposed to the diverse variety of political systems existent over the past years feudal baronies, city states, sprawling Coercion, Capital and European States, A.D A grand sweeping analysis of the formation of nationalities in Europe over a thousand years, explained in terms of the level and concentration of capital and the use of coercion Provocative, controversial and very well written Very distinguished author. Coercion, Capital, and European States, A.D by Coercion, Capital, and European States charts a grand theory of history that attempts to explain why Europe in the late th century looks like it does, a fairly uniform sprawl of nation state social democracies, as opposed to the diverse variety of political systems existent over the past years feudal baronies, city states, sprawling COERCION, CAPITAL, AND EUROPEAN STATES, Contents Preface IX Cities and States in World History States in History Available Answers Logics of Capital and Coercion War Drives State Formation and Transformation Long Trends and Interactions Prospects European Cities and States Absent Europe States and Coercion Cities and Capital City State Interaction State Physiologies Coercion, Capital and European States AD In this pathbreaking work, now available in paperback, Charles Tilly challenges all previous formulations of state development in Europe Specifically, Tilly charges that most available explanations fail because they do not account for the great variety of kinds of states which were viable at different stages of European history, and because they assume a unilinear path of state development What Shapes State Form An evaluation of Charles Tilly s Thankfully, such lapses are few and far between by in large, Coercion, Capital, and European States provides a compelling theory, and judged by the modest metrics that Tilly set for himself, is clearly a successful contribution to the literature on the evolution of state forms. War Made the State and the State Made War Duck of Minerva Coercion, Capital, and European States also makes two ofte neglected interventions in the study of state transformation that extend well beyond the specifics of European state formation First, Tilly s critique of unilinear approaches to state formation.

    • Best Read [Charles Tilly] ✓ Coercion, Capital, and European States, A.D. 990-1992 || [Chick Lit Book] PDF ✓
      429 Charles Tilly
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    One thought on “Coercion, Capital, and European States, A.D. 990-1992

    1. Hadrian on said:

      This is another one of those very small books which hopes to take on very big questions. One: How did Europe give rise to so many different types of polities in its earlier history, such as federations, religious states, kingdoms and knightly orders? Two: How did all of these different forms converge on the 'national state', or a government as we know it today?War is thus the fundamental activity which shaped nation-states over the past thousand years in Europe. Those states which had survived w [...]

    2. Anand Gopal on said:

      The book-length exposition of Charles Tilly's classic line about European state formation: "War made the state and the state made war." In a nutshell, his argument is: 1. certain rulers used guns and men (the means of "coercion") to conquer rivals. 2. Warfare forced these rulers to develop extractive apparatuses -- institutions for taxation, conscription, etc, in order to fund and man their conquests. 3. This led to the rise of state bureaucracies and, more generally, a centralized and different [...]

    3. Dylan Groves on said:

      Framing question: "What accounts for the great variation over time and space in the kinds of states that have prevailed in Europe since AD 990, and why did European states eventually converge on different variants of the national state?"three takeaways:1 - Extraction and struggle over the means of war propagated state formation in Europe2 - Variation in types of state formation can be traced to different levels of coercion and capital required for economic production (and therefore the means for [...]

    4. Eren Buğlalılar on said:

      Karşılaştırmalı bir tarih-siyaset-sosyoloji çalışması. Bin yıllık Avrupa tarihine bakıyor ve kıtadaki devletlerin nasıl olup da bu biçimi aldığına yanıt bulmaya çalışıyor. Tilly Avrupa'daki devlet oluşumunda gözlemlenen farklılıkları, "zor" ve "sermaye" kavramlarıyla açıklıyor. Her coğrafyada, zor ve sermaye kendine özgü bir karışım gösteriyor. Tilly bunları üçe ayırmış: 16. yüzyıla kadar Venedik'te bol sermaye ve onun hizmetine koşulmuş bir zor v [...]

    5. T.F. Rhoden on said:

      I really enjoyed this title.Tilly starts off by stating that his goal is to understand the origins of the national state in Europe. Now, first off, when I initially read that I thought that national state was a typo for nation-state (no al suffix), but he clearly delineates between the two (as does Anderson):- National State: governs multiple regions/cities via “centralized, differentiated, and autonomous structures.”- Nation-State: people within share “strong linguistic, religious, and sy [...]

    6. Daniel on said:

      In these days of historical specialization, a comprehensive treatment of any subject is most welcome, whatever its faults. Tilly has indeed set himself a daunting task, namely to explain the development of state formation in Europe over the last millennium; specifically, he seeks to explain why a pattern of divergent state formations ultimately converged in the form of the modern nation-state. To the chagrin of social scientists, he assumes that war has always been the central object of the stat [...]

    7. A. on said:

      Review: Coercion, Capital, and European States, AD 990-1992 by Charles Tilly For some time I have wanted to understand the evolution of kingdoms into modern states. This book seemed to offer answers. There is a sense in which Tilly’s answer is contained in the title: coercion, meaning war, and later, police power, and capital, meaning mercantilism (as opposed to a society of great landlords). Tilly constructs a series of combinations of the two forces which, he suggests, explains the developme [...]

    8. Colin on said:

      This is a partial re-read — I read portions of this around five years ago, and just re-visited it. In brief, the theory argues that European states started with varying endowments of capital and coercive resources and political actors who controlled them; the leaders of the proto-states drew upon these resources to consolidate their control over internal and external rivals; in doing so the most successful formed professional bureaucracies (usually formed in war, with a ratchet effect that led [...]

    9. Lanny Newton on said:

      Really good examination of the formation of the modern state, specifically the modern European national state. The author takes 1000 years of European history and compacts it into 227 pages using only what he needs to show the three paths taken. He openly admits the problems of doing this, such as skimming over important events, but does not contort history to make his argument. Parts of it could be further developed, and the sections of his last chapter on the forming of states in the modern wo [...]

    10. SpaceBear on said:

      War made state, and the state made war. Tilly's thesis in this book is that the modern state rose as a function of the need to make war, and to extract funding for those wars from the populations within the territorial controlled by the national state. Overtime, this necessitate all polities to adopt the same model.

    11. Trashy Pit on said:

      Tilly at his best!!! Excellent discussion of state development in Europe in the early modern period. Tilly is a master historian. He might not be right about everything, but there's alot of really important stuff here.

    12. Fabian on said:

      An ambitious empirical study tracing the role of warfare in the creation of the modern European state. It is a little tedious but comes to profound, hard-won conclusions.

    13. Øivind on said:

      Read this if you are at all into politcal science. Charles Tilly proves that he was the master of academias "big-wave " surfing.

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