Through the Eye of a Needle

John-Paul Flintoff

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Through the Eye of a Needle

Through the Eye of a Needle Through the Eye of a Needle is a brilliant account of his journey illuminating enchanting and often extremely funny arguing that the way we look at clothing influences the way we look at the environ

  • Title: Through the Eye of a Needle
  • Author: John-Paul Flintoff
  • ISBN: 9781856230452
  • Page: 246
  • Format: Paperback
  • Through the Eye of a Needle is a brilliant account of his journey illuminating, enchanting, and often extremely funny arguing that the way we look at clothing influences the way we look at the environment, the economy, and life itself Few books written in our soulless times have such potential to transform people s minds so completely while also making them laugh HisThrough the Eye of a Needle is a brilliant account of his journey illuminating, enchanting, and often extremely funny arguing that the way we look at clothing influences the way we look at the environment, the economy, and life itself Few books written in our soulless times have such potential to transform people s minds so completely while also making them laugh His encounters are by turns humorous and enlightening He meets BBC TV s Jeremy Clarkson, Hollywood superstars Richard Gere and Daryl Hannah, spiritual teachers, politicians, call center and sweatshop workers, artists, Transition Town leader Rob Hopkins, Prince Charles s own Savile Row tailor, and many others.

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      Posted by:John-Paul Flintoff
      Published :2018-04-14T18:18:56+00:00

    One thought on “Through the Eye of a Needle

    1. Mandy on said:

      This is quite an odd book - it doesn't really work as a book, but it doesn't really work as a collection of newspaper columns either, it's a kind of mongrel son of the two. That is a shame, because I really was interested in the story of Flintoff's efforts to live sustainably, and to find a religion that might suit him, and to learn to make his own clothes, and all the other mad schemes that he seemed to take up in a loosely linked and very ADD way. I liked the list of books at the end that he h [...]

    2. Emma Cooper on said:

      'Through the eye of the needle', by John-Paul Flintoff, has the subtitle 'The true story of a man who went searching for meaning - and ended up making his own Y-fronts' and I thought I would pick up some tips about making my own clothes from it, which is something I have been thinking about for years but haven't really got around to trying.Once I started reading it I realized that I had the wrong end of the stick, to a certain extent, but I wasn't disappointed because the book is a good read and [...]

    3. Phil on said:

      This wasn't the book I was expecting to read. I suspect that's less my fault, or indeed Jean-Paul Flintoff's fault and more to do with whoever wrote the marketing blurb for the back and front covers. So, to start, this isn't (really) a book about making your own clothes. True JPF does make clothes, but actual clothes-making takes up about 10% of the book.The crux of the book is about how modern humans have become separated from huge chunks of how life works - our whole lives are cogs within a pr [...]

    4. James Axtell on said:

      The version of the book that I read was called "Sew Your Own: Man finds happiness and meaning of life – making clothes" which I presume is a reprint under a new title?I really wondered where this was going after a series of rather random and apparently unconnected initial chapters. It felt rather like a Tony Hawks book that wasn't working. However, I persevered and the strands started to come together (no pun intended). I liked the way that a big-picture pursuit of meaning was intertwined with [...]

    5. Lisa Louie on said:

      A memoir of sorts that I picked up for its title, Sew Your Own, as it's known in the UK and Ireland, is an inspiring book not for the author's compelling personal odyssey, but for its humorous, digestible and practical approach to finding ways to live creatively, self-sufficiently, and sustainably. Through his reflections upon various economic philosophers and his encounters with real-world people who have found practical ways to live out their ethics as regards work and consumption, Flintoff e [...]

    6. Kate on said:

      I read this book because one of my favorite eco-friendly sewing bloggers sozowhatdoyouknow recommended it. This was a quick read but, made a GREAT IMPACT on the way I now consume goods, i'm even taking it a step further by no longer buying any sort of fabric or clothing brand new. One person CAN make a difference!

    7. Barbara Duvoisin on said:

      Recommended by India Knight, it's a fast read, but interesting little bits and bobs about religion, consumerism, kids, etc.

    8. Marina on said:

      A really thought-provoking and enjoyable book. I've darned my socks as a result!

    9. Tessa on said:

      I really liked the idea of this book but then having read it it felt like a bourgeous argument on why we should abandon mass tradeI am a seamstress and a knitter and a crocheter and i wanted him to actually talk about that at some point not about how much he admired ruskin and ghandione was reminded of a famous quote by William Morris - that poetry should be of the type a man could do whilst working at his loomwell Mr Flintoff, I admire that you considered buying a loom but i would rather have h [...]

    10. Ruth on said:

      Some collections of journalistic writing work, but this doesn't. Flintoff tackles weighty issues in a lighthearted way, but the collection seems superficial as a result. I would have liked more in-depth discussion of issues such as consumerism and waste. My favourite chapter was about Ivor Cutler, but unfortunately it was extremely short.

    11. Sharon on said:

      Life is too short to try and read a book you just aren't enjoying!This book was odd! It wasn't what I expected at all and a little too deep in places on various topics to keep my interest or for me to enjoy!Would I recommend it? Certainly not!Onto something better I think!

    12. Viv JM on said:

      Gently inspiring. Just the right mix of seriousness & humour. Lovely read!

    13. Heather on said:

      I read the American editioni thoroughly enjoyed it and have recommended it to a teen book group as a great introduction to philosophy.

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