The Motion Paradox: The 2,500-Year Old Puzzle Behind All the Mysteries of Time and Space

Joseph Mazur

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The Motion Paradox: The 2,500-Year Old Puzzle Behind All the Mysteries of Time and Space

The Motion Paradox The Year Old Puzzle Behind All the Mysteries of Time and Space The epic tale of an ancient unsolved puzzle and how it relates to all scientific attempts to explain the basic structure of the universe At the dawn of science the ancient Greek philosopher Zeno form

  • Title: The Motion Paradox: The 2,500-Year Old Puzzle Behind All the Mysteries of Time and Space
  • Author: Joseph Mazur
  • ISBN: 9780525949923
  • Page: 268
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The epic tale of an ancient, unsolved puzzle and how it relates to all scientific attempts to explain the basic structure of the universe At the dawn of science the ancient Greek philosopher Zeno formulated his paradox of motion, and amazingly, it is still on the cutting edge of all investigations into the fabric of reality.Zeno used logic to argue that motion is impossiblThe epic tale of an ancient, unsolved puzzle and how it relates to all scientific attempts to explain the basic structure of the universe At the dawn of science the ancient Greek philosopher Zeno formulated his paradox of motion, and amazingly, it is still on the cutting edge of all investigations into the fabric of reality.Zeno used logic to argue that motion is impossible, and at the heart of his maddening puzzle is the nature of space and time Is space time continuous or broken up like a string of beads Over the past two millennia, many of our greatest minds including Aristotle, Galileo, Newton, Einstein, Stephen Hawking, and other current theoreticians have been gripped by the mystery this puzzle represents.Joseph Mazur, acclaimed author of Euclid in the Rainforest, shows how historic breakthroughs in our understanding of motion shed light on Zeno s paradox The orbits of the planets were explained, the laws of motion were revealed, the theory of relativity was discovered but the basic structure of time and space remained elusive.In the tradition of Fermat s Enigma and Zero, The Motion Paradox is a lively history of this apparently simple puzzle whose solution if indeed it can be solved will reveal nothing less than the fundamental nature of reality.

    • ☆ The Motion Paradox: The 2,500-Year Old Puzzle Behind All the Mysteries of Time and Space || ☆ PDF Read by ò Joseph Mazur
      268 Joseph Mazur
    • thumbnail Title: ☆ The Motion Paradox: The 2,500-Year Old Puzzle Behind All the Mysteries of Time and Space || ☆ PDF Read by ò Joseph Mazur
      Posted by:Joseph Mazur
      Published :2018-06-07T05:12:12+00:00

    One thought on “The Motion Paradox: The 2,500-Year Old Puzzle Behind All the Mysteries of Time and Space

    1. Matthew Harbowy on said:

      I had high hopes for this book, but I feel like the author has let me down. My principal complaint with the book is akin to the complaint about the three statisticians who go hunting- one shoots high, the other shoots low, and the third yells "we got it!" Mazur looks at the world through a mathematicians eyes, and misses the forest for the trees. He is attempting to summarize his thoughts on the physical ramifications for the philosophy and math behind Zeno's paradox, completely ignoring the fac [...]

    2. Cara on said:

      Zeno's paradox is essentially this:To get from point A to point B, you must first arrive halfway between points A and B. Then you must get to halfway between that point and point B. Then to halfway between that point and point B. And you must do this infinitely many times before you get to point B, so you never arrive at B. Of course in practice you do manage to get to point B, hence the paradox.There's a bit more to it than that, but that's more or less the idea.The paradox is solved rather suc [...]

    3. Ashley Wang on said:

      I am by no means (and far from) an expert throughout the topics of mathematics, mechanics, philosophy, and anthropology; however, what I did learn from this book was a sense of unlimited wonder.Mazur takes a seemingly blunt paradox and explores its various origins, evolutions, and meanings. Although sometimes the perspective was narrowed and strict, Mazur created an awe-inspiring, almost innocent, atmosphere. This made his tone incredibly genuine. When I thought there was less to the paradox, he [...]

    4. Glenn on said:

      The motion paradox, quoted right from the book "Zeno argues that movement is impossible because in order for a body to move any distance it must first get to half the distance, then half the remaining distance, and so on, forever reaching half of some remaining distance - hence, never reaching the full distance.".Of course, we know that's not true, thus the paradox.This book was OK, but IMO did not focus enough on the motion paradox, instead covering a lot of tangential scientific material not d [...]

    5. Robin Goodfellow on said:

      This is a terrific and comprehensive book. It appears that some people didn't get the book's many subtleties, which is of course to be expected since the subject of the book are mysteries of reality that are still puzzled over by the best and brightest the world over. Disregard any review here below that presumes to have solid and simple grasp of the deep questions this book addresses. Mazur demonstrates a masterful understanding of the complexities of both the math and the philosophy, and eluci [...]

    6. Maggie on said:

      I got a few chapters into it and set it down to finish something else. My mother then borrowed it and didn't give it back until it was due at the library. I'll have to place a hold on it again for a chance to finish it.

    7. Pamela on said:

      An elegant book about Zeno's paradox and, to use a cliche that's appropriate here, the mysteries of time and space. There are some equations in the text, but they are understandable in context even for the mathematically challenged.

    8. Kat on said:

      I think the premise of this book was pretty weak, or wasn't well-developed. The history mentioned in this book was great to read, but I don't think things were pulled together very well - it didn't feel like an urgent problem to me.

    9. Eric on said:

      A moderately interesting book, but not the best I've read of a scientific nature. It didn't seem to live up to its promise all that well - I felt distracted by the end.

    10. Jay jackson on said:

      Fantastic book. Easy to read and understand even for a layman like myself. I particularly enjoyed the historical overview.

    11. Rozinul Aqli on said:

      too bad I just find this book when I have been enrolled in college, as a social science student. :(

    12. Martin Adams on said:

      interesting but sometimes difficult to follow the reasoning if you don't get all the math

    13. BrendanMcAuliffe on said:

      Useful to see if you can pick out all the weird mistakes

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