The Puritan Family: Religion and Domestic Relations in Seventeenth-Century New England

Edmund S. Morgan

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The Puritan Family: Religion and Domestic Relations in Seventeenth-Century New England

The Puritan Family Religion and Domestic Relations in Seventeenth Century New England The Puritans came to New England not merely to save their souls but to establish a visible kingdom of God a society where outward conduct would be according to God s laws This book discusses the desi

  • Title: The Puritan Family: Religion and Domestic Relations in Seventeenth-Century New England
  • Author: Edmund S. Morgan
  • ISBN: 9780061312274
  • Page: 335
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Puritans came to New England not merely to save their souls but to establish a visible kingdom of God, a society where outward conduct would be according to God s laws This book discusses the desire of the Puritans to be socially virtuous and their wish to force social virtue upon others.

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      Posted by:Edmund S. Morgan
      Published :2019-01-18T22:00:30+00:00

    One thought on “The Puritan Family: Religion and Domestic Relations in Seventeenth-Century New England

    1. Chris on said:

      I read this wonderful examination of what life was like for "typical" Puritan family in the 1600s as research for a novel I'm writing. Actually, I reread it. I read it for the first time when I was in college. But it was every bit as interesting and eye-opening as when I read it over thirty years ago. Also? I loved seeing what I had underlined then. The Puritans were considerably more randy than we give them credit for today.

    2. Laurie on said:

      This book won't suit everyone -- especially anyone not particularly interested in this aspect of American history, which is the reason I gave it 4 rather than 5 stars. But if you are interested at all, this is a book to read. It is a shortish book (186 pp) divided into seven chapters: (1) Puritanism and Society; (2) Husband and Wife; (3) Parents and Children; (4) The Education of a Saint; (5) Masters and Servants; (6) The Family in the Social Order; and (7) Puritan Tribalism. We tend to think of [...]

    3. Caroline on said:

      This is the best text I have read about the Puritans so far. Although short, every page is packed with meaningful evidence and conclusions. Mr. Morgan shares my approach to history: that one of the historian's primary duties is to investigate the uncomfortable cultural differences of the past until they are no longer strange. Puritan society appears rigid and fanatical to our modern eyes, but hidden beneath the surface is a culture of courage, hope, and selfless ideals.

    4. Peter N. on said:

      I am hesitant to comment too much on this book because my knowledge of this period of history is weak. I still found it very fascinating. The most notable thing from the history section was that required obedience can lead to requited affection. The Puritans were strict and hard in many places. But their letters to each other demonstrate that this firm line did not generally cause disdain from their children, wives, or servants. Instead it often produced affection and warmth. It is also interest [...]

    5. Katherine Addison on said:

      This is a low-key book, sympathetic to its subject matter as many books about the Puritans are not. I found it useful for explanations of a number of things about the Puritans' conception of the family which I had not known; it dovetailed nicely withEntertaining Satan: Witchcraft and the Culture of Early New England in clarifying certain aspects of Puritan communities.

    6. Alaina on said:

      Excellent; it explains so much about the modern American Evangelical community, as well as what would become the philosophical basis for America itself.

    7. Petra X on said:

      This was too dry to be a good read. The title was fascinating to me, the contents were not.

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