Capitalism 4.0: Economics, Politics, and Markets After the Crisis

Anatole Kaletsky

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Capitalism 4.0: Economics, Politics, and Markets After the Crisis

Capitalism Economics Politics and Markets After the Crisis In early many economists financiers and media pundits were confidently predicting the end of the American led capitalism that has shaped history and economics for the past years Yet the U

  • Title: Capitalism 4.0: Economics, Politics, and Markets After the Crisis
  • Author: Anatole Kaletsky
  • ISBN: 9781586488710
  • Page: 209
  • Format: Hardcover
  • In early 2009, many economists, financiers, and media pundits were confidently predicting the end of the American led capitalism that has shaped history and economics for the past 100 years Yet the U.S economic model, far from being discredited, may be strengthened by the financial crisis.In this provocative book, Anatole Kaletsky re interprets the financial crisis as paIn early 2009, many economists, financiers, and media pundits were confidently predicting the end of the American led capitalism that has shaped history and economics for the past 100 years Yet the U.S economic model, far from being discredited, may be strengthened by the financial crisis.In this provocative book, Anatole Kaletsky re interprets the financial crisis as part of an evolutionary process inherent to the nature of democratic capitalism Capitalism, he argues, is resilient Its first form, Capitalism 1.0, was the classical laissez faire capitalism that lasted from 1776 until 1930 Next was Capitalism 2.0, New Deal Keynesian social capitalism created in the 1930s and extinguished in the 1970s Its last mutation, Reagan Thatcher market fundamentalism, culminated in the financially dominated globalization of the past decade and triggered the recession of 2009 10 The self destruction of Capitalism 3.0 leaves the field open for the next phase of capitalism s evolution Capitalism is likely to transform in the coming decades into something different both from the totally deregulated market fundamentalism of Reagan Thatcher and from the Roosevelt Kennedy era This is Capitalism 4.0.

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      Published :2018-06-11T11:30:16+00:00

    One thought on “Capitalism 4.0: Economics, Politics, and Markets After the Crisis

    1. Koen Crolla on said:

      There's something about capitalist economics that creates this parade of blinkered assholes pretending they're above it all while still falling in lock-step with fashionable dogma. Life is too short.

    2. Benhamish Allen on said:

      I've never been too fond of capitalism, but I do like Mcdonald's hamburgers, go figure. The book seems to be telling me that if it wasn't for the bailouts and such, the world would have experienced a great depression instead of a great recession. It does make a kind of sense, and then goes on to say that in the future (Capitalism 4.0) It should be expected of governments to take a more active role in managing the markets.I am more interested in Capitalism 5.0+, or the end of the market.

    3. Chris on said:

      This book is a very high level ideas-y big picture take on what the author argues will emerge for Capitalism in the aftermath of the present crisis. He defines Capitalism 1 as the early laissez-faire wild days; Cap 2.0 was the Keynesian governmental management epoch; and then Capitalism 3.0 was the market fundamentalism started by Reagan and Thatcher which ended with Lehman Brothers. Capitalism 4.0 is a big ideas book. It's also kind of an exemplar of the way I've always tried to teach extempers [...]

    4. James on said:

      Books about finance, economics, either they're great or terrible.Few are in between. This author thinks the great financial crisis, CFC, wasn't caused by deadbeat borrowers,stupid bankers, or greed on wall street. It was all caused by ONE MAN. Sec. of Treasury, Hank Paulson. bla bla bla If you believe that, I have a bridge in NYC for sale.

    5. David on said:

      An excellent book on the way forward from the Credit Crunch and the collapse of market fundamentalism. Sometimes it leans a little too heavily in the Keynesian direction for my taste but, on the whole, a great attempt to develop a 'mixed economy' paradigm.

    6. Danielle on said:

      A manifesto on the direction for the evolution of capitalism starting with the historical context of the different stages of capitalism, focusing on the relationship, nature and responsibilities of market forces/ government intervention. An attempt to explain the escalation/resolution of economic boom-bust cycles and crises and a look at the different perspectives towards economics in academia. Bold predictions on what the new direction for capitalism will look like.

    7. E on said:

      Heady ride through the history and future of capitalismCapitalism is dead; long live capitalism. That’s the central tenet of veteran business journalist Anatole Kaletsky’s instructive, perceptive tome. Global capitalism has served humanity pretty well over the centuries, and it has survived by changing with the times. The aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis and the near collapse of the world’s financial system demand a major revamp of free market thinking. The new version, which Kaletsk [...]

    8. E on said:

      Heady ride through the history and future of capitalismCapitalism is dead; long live capitalism. That’s the central tenet of veteran business journalist Anatole Kaletsky’s instructive, perceptive tome. Global capitalism has served humanity pretty well over the centuries, and it has survived by changing with the times. The aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis and the near collapse of the world’s financial system demand a major revamp of free market thinking. The new version, which Kaletsk [...]

    9. Tim Wu on said:

      Insightful piece that defines the interplay between economics and politics in the post financial crisis era. Through drawing upon past economic disasters/miracles, Kaletsky extrapoliates the development of capitalism strongly substantiated by his extensive knowledge in the subject matter. Capitalism, the triumphant economic modus operandi of the past century, would not falter in the face of a crisis. Instead, Capitalism would reengineer itself to fit the fluidity and uncertainty of the economic [...]

    10. Tobias on said:

      The opening page of this book contains the sentence: "A return to decent economic growth and normal financial conditions is likely by the middle of 2010" *coughs* The rest of the book's argument is judging by the introduction and conclusion which is all I read is that capitalism can and will survive so long as it introduces a sort of profit-driven green new deal accompanied by ecocological and socially-based accounting standards. The alternative to this is a loss of power of Western capitalism t [...]

    11. Matthew Hines on said:

      First off, let me be clear: if you haven't at least taken one course in Macro Economics, then chances are you might not understand what author Kaletsky is saying. That being said, this is one of the best explanations about the rise and fall of different economic theories, and why the crisis of 2008 is changing the current Monetarist viewpoint. Kaletsky argues that some hybrid form of Keynesianism and Monetarism will emerge in the very near future, and what each view brings to the table in tomorr [...]

    12. Brad on said:

      Very dense subject but hang in there. If you are not an economist, you need to lean your head back and let the words pour over you. At some point in the text, it should all click (it did for me.)Bottom line, Mr. Kaletsky's theses is not whether capitalism will survive the current "Great Recession" but what type of capitalism will it be. He starts off by explaining the three other incarnations of capitalism starting after the defeat of Napoleon (1815) up to 2010. I am glad I read it. I feel I hav [...]

    13. Chris on said:

      Long read, many good theories and possibilities. The author leaves himself a lot of wiggle room much as my son did when I asked him why he was majoring in Psychology as an undergraduate. His answer was "because there are no wrong answers".

    14. Roman on said:

      Deutsche Version "Kapitalismus 4.0 - Geburtsstunde einer Wirtschaftsordnungamazon/Kapitalismus-4-0

    15. Harold on said:

      This is a great overview of our current financial mess and how we got here, and full of optimism to boot. Not an easy read but well worth it.

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