Operation Mincemeat: How a Dead Man and a Bizarre Plan Fooled the Nazis and Assured an Allied Victory

Ben Macintyre JohnLee

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Operation Mincemeat: How a Dead Man and a Bizarre Plan Fooled the Nazis and Assured an Allied Victory

Operation Mincemeat How a Dead Man and a Bizarre Plan Fooled the Nazis and Assured an Allied Victory Ben Macintyre s Agent Zigzag was hailed as rollicking spellbinding New York Times wildly improbable but entirely true Entertainment Weekly and quite simply the best book ever written Boston Glo

  • Title: Operation Mincemeat: How a Dead Man and a Bizarre Plan Fooled the Nazis and Assured an Allied Victory
  • Author: Ben Macintyre JohnLee
  • ISBN: 9780307735690
  • Page: 446
  • Format: Audio CD
  • Ben Macintyre s Agent Zigzag was hailed as rollicking, spellbinding New York Times , wildly improbable but entirely true Entertainment Weekly , and, quite simply, the best book ever written Boston Globe In his new book, Operation Mincemeat, he tells an extraordinary story that will delight his legions of fans.In 1943, from a windowless basement office in London,Ben Macintyre s Agent Zigzag was hailed as rollicking, spellbinding New York Times , wildly improbable but entirely true Entertainment Weekly , and, quite simply, the best book ever written Boston Globe In his new book, Operation Mincemeat, he tells an extraordinary story that will delight his legions of fans.In 1943, from a windowless basement office in London, two brilliant intelligence officers conceived a plan that was both simple and complicated Operation Mincemeat The purpose To deceive the Nazis into thinking that Allied forces were planning to attack southern Europe by way of Greece or Sardinia, rather than Sicily, as the Nazis had assumed, and the Allies ultimately chose Charles Cholmondeley of MI5 and the British naval intelligence officer Ewen Montagu could not have been different Cholmondeley was a dreamer seeking adventure Montagu was an aristocratic, detail oriented barrister But together they were the perfect team and created an ingenious plan Get a corpse, equip it with secret but false and misleading papers concerning the invasion, then drop it off the coast of Spain where German spies would, they hoped, take the bait The idea was approved by British intelligence officials, including Ian Fleming creator of James Bond Winston Churchill believed it might ring true to the Axis and help bring victory to the Allies.Filled with spies, double agents, rogues, fearless heroes, and one very important corpse, the story of Operation Mincemeat reads like an international thriller.Unveiling never before released material, Ben Macintyre brings the reader right into the minds of intelligence officers, their moles and spies, and the German Abwehr agents who suffered the twin frailties of wishfulness and yesmanship He weaves together the eccentric personalities of Cholmondeley and Montagu and their near impossible feats into a riveting adventure that not only saved thousands of lives but paved the way for a pivotal battle in Sicily and, ultimately, Allied success in the war.From the Hardcover edition.

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      Published :2018-04-02T23:09:51+00:00

    One thought on “Operation Mincemeat: How a Dead Man and a Bizarre Plan Fooled the Nazis and Assured an Allied Victory

    1. David on said:

      I feel I ought to have liked this book more than I did. Lord knows, the author did his research, in commendable detail. But did he really have to include everything he learned in the final book? At some point the level of detail provided went (for me) beyond interesting and started to become stultifying. MacIntyre is a decent writer, but I think he falls into the trap that bedevils many non-fiction authors -- all the time and energy spent doing the research causes him to lose perspective. The st [...]

    2. Jason Koivu on said:

      When a dead man becomes a highly effective spy, fools the enemy and helps win a war with the world in the balance, well, that sounds like something James Bond writer Ian Fleming would concoct. Oh wait, he did. To be specific (and more correct), Operation Mincemeat, a plan devised by Britain's intelligence agency MI5 to convince Germany that a southern attack on Europe via the Mediterranean by Allied forces, was signed off on by Fleming, one of many in Britain's spy ring. Though Fleming may not h [...]

    3. Manny on said:

      The basic story is well known, but since the appearance of the first book, The Man Who Never Was, an extraordinary amount of new material has become available. Even if you've read The Man Who Never Was (I had), I can't recommend Operation Mincemeat highly enough. This is, quite simply, the most extraordinary book of its kind that I've ever come across. I couldn't put it down, and finished it in a little more than a day.The plot in a nutshell, in case you aren't already familiar with it. It's ear [...]

    4. Nancy Oakes on said:

      Briefly, I have to say that this is one of the most fascinating books of history I've read in a very long time. You don't even need to be a WWII buff to appreciate it -- I'm not -- but it's simply amazing. The basic story is this: it's 1943, and the Allies have plans to invade Sicily to get a foothold in Europe and defeat Hitler. But since Sicily is the most obvious place for an Allied landing, Ewen Montagu and Charles Cholmondeley (it's pronounced "Chumley") of the Naval Intelligence section of [...]

    5. Caroline on said:

      It's a rare gem when history is unfolded for us in such a detailed and thrilling form. In 1943, Ewan Montagu of the British Naval Intelligence and Charles Cholmondeley of MI5 came together in collaboration of a complex plan of deception. The plan that was ultimately approved was to take a suitable corpse, dress it in a suitable military uniform, place certain well-planned personal items, attach to it a chained briefcase containing fake official documents and personal letters, and then drop it th [...]

    6. Mikey B. on said:

      A marvellous story of intrigue of actual events during World War II. There are a host of wonderful and eclectic characters in England, Spain and Germany. The author presents all these in readable detail.The sequence of events – and there are several – are well depicted and we are clearly presented with the logical construction of this set-up meant to deceive the Germans into believing that the Allies mean to launch a multi-pronged invasion in the Mediterranean – instead of just Sicily. The [...]

    7. Amy on said:

      You can't make this stuff up! Or more precisely, you can which is what makes this story of espionage and deception so much fun. It is almost hard to believe it is all true. When I first began the book, I didn't think Ben Macintyre had enough material to make an interesting story. I presumed he would be repetitive, or worse, insert his own personal 'journey' into the narrative. I was proved decidedly wrong in both cases. So many unique, colorful characters pepper the story of Operation Mincemeat [...]

    8. Erik Graff on said:

      Dad was involved in the occupation of N. Africa and in the landings at Gela on the south coast of Sicily. An army cryptanalyst attached to the U.S. navy, he and his colleagues maintained ship-to-shore communications during the successful invasion. Books relevant to his experiences there and in the Pacific have long attracted my attention.This book is an account of how the British successfully misled the Germans and Italians into believing that their European invasion plans were directed at Sardi [...]

    9. Hannah on said:

      Rating Clarification: 4.5 StarsFrom the book blurb:"In 1943, from a windowless basement office in London, two brilliant intelligence officers (Charles Cholmondeley of MI5 and the British naval intelligence officer Ewen Montagu) conceived a plan that was both simple and complicated— Operation Mincemeat. The purpose? To deceive the Nazis into thinking that Allied forces were planning to attack southern Europe by way of Greece or Sardinia, rather than Sicily, as the Nazis had assumed, and the All [...]

    10. Tal on said:

      Seen the documentary from Ben Macintyre.youtube/watch?v=Gh8D3Highly recommended!!!

    11. Mahlon on said:

      You may not be familiar with the names Ewen Montagu or Charles Cholmondeley but you may have heard of Operation Mincemeat, The spectacularly successful in World War II deception that they masterminded. Mincemeat was a small part of operation Barclay the deception intended to cover the invasion of Italy. Mincemeat convinced The German High Command that the allies target would be Sardinia or Greece, rather than the actual target Sicily. The ruse was accomplished by convincing the Germans that they [...]

    12. Dana Stabenow on said:

      An almost picaresque story about Royal Marine Major William Martin, who was lost at sea in an aircraft accident carrying important dispatches about future Allied plans in the Mediterranean. His body washed ashore in Spain and by nefarious means the dispatches were copied and forwarded to Abwehr, German intelligence. Except that that major was no major and those dispatches were fake. It was all an elaborate plot cooked up by British Intelligence to deceive the enemy, and which disinformation Abwe [...]

    13. F.R. on said:

      The fashion for World War Two films and novels these days is to play down the derring-do and instead concentrate on what exposure to all that battle and death does to a person’s soul. (Alistair MacLean is not an author in vogue.) Exactly the same is true of the spy genre, where the duplicity these men (and, to a lesser degree, women) do whilst playing their great game eats away at their insides. And yet in Ben McIntyre’s two non-fiction books detailing strange tales of espionage in the Secon [...]

    14. Nick Davies on said:

      This thoroughly fascinating non-fiction about the British WWII plot to mislead the Axis forces (and hence allow decisive invasion of Sicily) by use of a corpse washed ashore in Spain, was well-written and made for a very interesting story. I'd heartily recommend people read this to learn more about the history of that time, especially if they have an interest in the part military intelligence forces play in the 'background' of war.It was excellently researched and an absorbing read - I am lookin [...]

    15. Bou on said:

      This book by Ben MacIntyre is a very interesting and most of all enjoyable read. It almost reads like a novel. Ben MacIntyre leaves no stone unturned. I particularly enjoyed his description of the German reception of the fake documents and the aftermath of it. Also, the final chapters describes the fate of all participants in this high suspense operation, which is very nice to know.

    16. Tony on said:

      I like reading about espionage and World War II every once in a while, so based on some favorable review I read somewhere, I picked this up. Unfortunately, like all too many popular nonfiction books I seem to encounter these days (such as The Tiger and In the Heart of the Sea, to name the two most recent examples I read), the book is overstuffed with extraneous detail and (to my mind at least) vastly overstates the importance of the topic it covers. The title refers to a British intelligence ope [...]

    17. Nigeyb on said:

      Apparently, whilst writing Agent Zigzag: A True Story of Nazi Espionage, Love, and Betrayal, Ben Macintyre became aware of this strange tale of espionage and deception. I read, and really enjoyed, Ben Macintyre's Agent Zigzag in April 2013, and so didn't need much convincing to read this book too. It's not as entertaining and compelling as Agent Zigzag, however, whilst not quite as gripping, it is a story of huge significance to the way the Second World War played out. It saved lives, shortened [...]

    18. Huw Rhys on said:

      I do like the odd History book - and this was an odd history book - and I liked it!Firstly, you get the sense that you've read this story before, and you know the outcome. Then you remember that you read "The Man Who Never Was", and saw the film (countless times) over the years. Because "Operation Mincemeat" is pretty much this same story all over again. So like "The Titanic", you know the main parts - and you know the end. But it's the detail in between that is so absorbing here.Most historical [...]

    19. Racheli Zusiman on said:

      ספר מעניין על מבצע הונאה של הבריטים במלחמת העולם השנייה. לטעמי הוא היה קצת יותר מידי עמוס בפרטים קטנים ולא עד כדי כך חשובים על סף הרכילות בבחינת - מרוב עצים, הסיפור המעניין של היער לא מקבל מספיק אפקט וואו :-) גם קצת הלכתי לאיבוד בנבכי המבנה הארגוני של עולם המודיעין, הצבא והדיפלו [...]

    20. Peter Spence on said:

      An intriguing rendition of an almost incredible deception operation that helped turn the course of World War II in favour of the Allies.A real-life "James Bond" story even featuring Ian Fleming in his official WW II spy role.I must now read Ewan Montagu's first-hand account of the operation.

    21. Jill Meyer on said:

      often do succeed. The year 1943 was a turning point in WW2. In the European theater, the Germans were being pushed back on the Russian front and the Allies had gained back much of what they had lost in North Africa to the Axis powers. Allied leaders - both political and military - had to decide where the next military push should be. All agreed the island of Sicily - off the coast of the Italian boot - was the place to begin working on the long sought invasion of the European continent. It was c [...]

    22. Dawn on said:

      “In 1943, two brilliant intelligence officers conceived a plan that was dubbed Operation Mincemeat. They would trick the Nazis into thinking that Allied forces were planning to attack southern Europe by way of Greece rather than Sicily… Their plan was to get a corpse, equip it with misleading papers concerning the invasion, then drop it off the coast of Spain where German spies would take the bait.”History aside, this was a fun book just for its insight into intelligence operations. I assu [...]

    23. Kurt on said:

      The rule of thumb is that if you have to explain a joke, it isn't funny. But if you do explain a joke, then I know how it works. Operation Mincemeat was the name of an intelligence plan carried out by the British against the Germans during World War II, designed to fool them into thinking that the Allied assault from North Africa would not be going through Sicily - where all rational people assumed it would go - but instead through Sardinia and Greece, and any references to Sicily were merely de [...]

    24. Tony on said:

      OPERATION MINCEMEAT. (2010). Ben Macintyre. ****. Using recently declassified files from the British Secret Service, the author has painstakingly pieced together the story of one of the most successful deceptions of the enemy utilized during wartime. In a nutshell, a body of a British officer was deposited in the sea off the coast of Spain, near a fairly well staffed German diplomatic office. A Spanish fisherman found the body and brought it to shore. It was turned over to the Spanish police and [...]

    25. Mike Knox on said:

      A thrilling book about how British espionage and deception in World War II fooled Hitler and enabled the Allies to make a decisive takeover of the island of Sicily.The author, being an author, cannot help himself from noting the influence of writers in this complicated scheme. The story begins with a top secret memo entitled “The Trout Fisher,” issued under the name of Admiral John Godfrey, who was helped along by the future James Bond novelist Ian Flemming. The memo contained 51 suggestions [...]

    26. Bob Uva on said:

      This is the story of an ingenious plan to deceive the Nazis into thinking that the southern European invasion would come in Greece rather than in Sicily, as actually happened. The plan involved floating a dead courier's body ashore in southern Spain, after which it was hoped the many pro-German spies would discover a letter between Allied Generals indicating the direction of the European invasion plans. The story is quite amazing, especially in the fact that it worked. I enjoyed hearing how the [...]

    27. Regina Lindsey on said:

      Here's an idea to use in wartime, "a corpse dressed as a an airman, with dispatches in his pockets, could be dropped on the coast, supposedly from a parachute that had failed," to trick the enemy (pg 20). Yeah, and we could do this trick the Nazis into thinking, from the dispatches, that we (the Allies) are going to attack Greece instead of Sicily! Sound like a scene from a James Bond movie? That's because it's the brainchild of Ian Fleming who would go on to write the James Bond novels. Of cour [...]

    28. Tracey on said:

      I recently picked up this book thanks to friedo's recommendation over on the SDMB and F.R. Jameson's 4 star rating here. I'd recently read For Your Eyes Only: Ian Fleming And James Bond by the same author, and was interested to find out more specifics about this audacious disinformation plan that the Fleming bio only hinted at. Macintyre's book is extremely well-researched and detailed; but reads like fiction. The main characters - Flight Lieutenant Charles Cholmondeley and Lieutenant Commander [...]

    29. Kirsti on said:

      "Montagu and Cholmondeley took turns lying in the back and trying to sleep, as if that were possible when being driven at high speed by a myopic Grand Prix driver with no headlights.""I had a Peppermint Creme and a Caramello--very nice." --Major Derrick Leverton, writing to his mother while he was at sea during a gale-force storm, about an hour before the invasion of Sicily. During this time his shipmates were vomiting from seasickness and sheer terror. Later on, during the actual invasion, he a [...]

    30. Helen on said:

      What's great about this book are not only the extraordinary facts of the story itself, but the cheeky, clubby descriptions of these too-strange-for-fiction characters who perpetrated possibly the greatest hoax of World War II. By the time I came to the last page, I felt like I knew them all personally, from the eccentric British intelligence officers, to the poor soul whose corpse was cobbled into serving the British Secret Service, to the Nazi spies who pounced eagerly on the bait. I couldn't p [...]

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