Cassell Dictionary of Superstitions

David Pickering

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Cassell Dictionary of Superstitions

Cassell Dictionary of Superstitions An A Z guide to the origins and meaning of superstitions Find a wealth of fascinating facts and a number of fun spells to try including a rhyme to say to the new moon for revealing the identity of you

  • Title: Cassell Dictionary of Superstitions
  • Author: David Pickering
  • ISBN: 9780304345359
  • Page: 457
  • Format: Hardcover
  • An A Z guide to the origins and meaning of superstitions Find a wealth of fascinating facts and a number of fun spells to try including a rhyme to say to the new moon for revealing the identity of your true love For those who believe in breaking a leg , or for anyone interested in folklore and popular culture, this is sure to be an entertaining read as well as an iAn A Z guide to the origins and meaning of superstitions Find a wealth of fascinating facts and a number of fun spells to try including a rhyme to say to the new moon for revealing the identity of your true love For those who believe in breaking a leg , or for anyone interested in folklore and popular culture, this is sure to be an entertaining read as well as an invaluable reference.

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      Posted by:David Pickering
      Published :2019-02-08T09:33:54+00:00

    One thought on “Cassell Dictionary of Superstitions

    1. Terence on said:

      I haven't actually "read" this tome. I picked it up today at one of my libraries for a dollar and already I've learned something:molucca bean A kind of bean or nut, sometimes worn as an amulet in the Western Isles of Scotland.When witchcraft is threatened the beans turn black, warning of misfortune or death. They are particularly credited with assisting women in childbirth and with preventing death by drowning.I look forward to acquiring many more superstitions in the months ahead.

    2. A Voracious Reader (a.k.a. Carol) on said:

      This shit is unreal. How did humans survive their superstitions?!Review upcoming

    3. Rowan on said:

      A pretty interesting book of superstitions and old wives tales. I've had this one in my collection for quite a while.I can even remember carrying it around during my high school days. Quite useful if your a writer wanting to add some interest to your writing, just don't take everything in it too seriously.

    4. Sandra on said:

      This is sort of a dictionary of fears and old wives' tales. It was interesting to read, although there is far too many things listed that no one would have ever imagined. Not for the average reader.

    5. Dexter on said:

      Interesting stuff. I think it'd be more interesting if there were more dates, such as when certain superstitions were in their prime and that sort of thing. It often makes it sound like a lot of the superstitions are followed religiously by everyone in an entire country all the time, and I know for a fact that can't be true. There were also certain superstitions that could've been detailed a little more, I feel like.But who knew so many things could be used to see a vision of your future lover.

    6. Melinda on said:

      Goodwill pick for the cool cover art. Like others, I thought this would be a great reference for writing. Entertaining, the kind of book of lists you can get lost in for hours. Check out the entry on curing bedwetting.

    7. Yvonne on said:

      A quick and interesting read of various superstitions, as the title implies. I found it a fun and entertaining read. It's interesting how some of these 'superstitions' continue into modern day society.

    8. Marie Sieloff on said:

      Awesome book. Would recommend this to anyone interested in the superstitions our ancestors believed in.

    9. Bee Watermeier on said:

      Contains obvious superstitions, a good overall read and reference material. However it is not as extensive as I would have liked.

    10. Amanda on said:

      A very well researched book on all superstitions. It's amazing what some people used to (and still do) believe in.

    11. Willow on said:

      Interesting book! There were so many superstitions I'd never even heard of.

    12. Stephen Simpson on said:

      It probably would have been better titled as a "Dictionary of British Superstitions" as there were relatively few mentions of superstitions from other cultures.

    13. Nathan Daniels on said:

      Definitely interesting. You can harvest some ideas for fiction from these pages.

    14. Molly on said:

      This fascinating work helps to decode the hows and whys of superstitions. It's a very accessible work that has, sadly, been rendered rather pointless by the internet.

    15. Regina on said:

      Very short and to the point, I liked that it has indication to origin. But this one is not unique, other than its cover and it had nice old books smell to it - book is from the library.

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